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Alma 8 to 12 – Jesus Christ Will Come to Redeem His People
Friday, June 5, 2020

Alma 8 to 12 – Jesus Christ Will Come to Redeem His People

Amulek tells of his miraculous conversion and teaches that the Son of God would come into the world to redeem his people and take their sins upon him. 

“The Probationary Nature of Mortality,” Robert J. Matthews, The Book of Mormon: Alma, The Testimony of the Word 
“Alma (Alma 11-12) delivered a pointed discourse on the doctrine of the Resurrection and also of the day in which every person will be required to give an account before the judgment bar in the presence of God. Although the entire audience was astonished at the doctrine Amulek taught them, Zeezrom was particularly fearful about the prospect of standing before God to answer for his conduct and began to tremble under a consciousness of his guilt.”

"The Trial of Alma and Amulek," John W. Welch, Legal Cases in the Book of Mormon
Alma 8-14 gives a jarring account of Nehorism’s perversion of justice. The people of Ammonihah rejected Alma and Amulek and found legal grounds to condemn their preaching under the law. However, despite the people's accusations, Alma and Amulek likewise found ways to accuse their persecutors of not complying with the Law of Moses.

"The Nephite and Jewish Practice of Blessing God after Eating One's Fill," Angela M. Crowell, John A. Tvedtnes, Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 6, no. 2
In Alma 8, Alma eats a meal with Amulek and then after utters a prayer to thank God. While many Christians today are used to offering prayers before meals are eaten, Alma's behavior matches the Jewish practice of offering prayer in thanksgiving after a meal has been eaten.

"When Less is More: The Reticent Narrator in the Story of Alma and Amulek," Charles Swift, Religious Educator 13, no. 1
The way the narrator of Alma 8-15 conveys information and chooses what to include increases the poignancy of Alma and Amulek’s story and brings further insight into the narrative.

"A Nickname and a Slam Dunk: Notes on the Book of Mormon Names Zeezrom and Jershon," Stephen D. Ricks, Interpreter: A Journal of Mormon Scripture 8
The name Zeezrom, possibly meaning “He of the silver (money),” may be used as more of a nickname than an actual given name. The place name Jershon likely means “place of inheritance.”

"Weighing and Measuring in the Worlds of the Book of Mormon," John W. Welch, Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 8, no. 2
The discussion of weights and measures in the middle of Alma 11 may appear interruptive and misplaced, but it is connected to understanding bribery and corruption that appears in this narrative.

"Chart 8-110: King Mosiah's Monetary System," John W. Welch and Greg Welch, Charting the Book of Mormon
King Mosiah's system of weights and measures established equivalencies between amounts of silver, gold, and grains.

"Alma 12: The Universal Power of Apostasy," LeGrand L. Baker and Stephen D. Ricks, Who Shall Ascend Into the Hill of the Lord?: The Psalms in Israel's Temple Worship in the Old Testament and the Book of Mormon
Apostasy may stem from political challenge to priesthood authority, and then a major change of doctrine corrupts the understanding of the Atonement and ordinances.

"Alma 12:3: But Thou Hast Lied Unto God," LeGrand L. Baker and Stephen D. Ricks, Who Shall Ascend Into the Hill of the Lord?: The Psalms in Israel's Temple Worship in the Old Testament and the Book of Mormon
One cannot lie to God without first lying about one’s Self to one’s Self.

"Alma 12:5-6, The Power of an Embrace," LeGrand L. Baker and Stephen D. Ricks, Who Shall Ascend Into the Hill of the Lord?: The Psalms in Israel's Temple Worship in the Old Testament and the Book of Mormon
While an embrace is a sign of love and the giving of one's self, it can also be used as a symbol for the Devil's dominion over a person.