Mosiah 1 to 3 – “Filled with Love towards God and All Men”

Benjamin, the servant-king, gathered his people to present to them a new king, his son Mosiah, and taught them to follow God. All are indebted to God, and the only way to be reconciled to him is by putting off the natural man and becoming sanctified through Christ.

King Benjamin’s Speech: “That Ye May Learn Wisdom”
This book, published in 1998, is available for download as a whole or by individual chapters. The keynote address, by Elder Neal A. Maxwell, is “King Benjamin’s Sermon: A Manual for Discipleship.” Eleven other chapters by various scholars discuss such topics as Benjamin, the man; the sermon as a farewell address; the sermon in context of ancient Israelite festivals; parallelism and chiasmus in the speech; and the speech as a precursor of the sacrament prayers. 

"King Benjamin: In the Service of Your God," Susan Easton Black, in The Book of Mormon: Mosiah, Salvation Only Through Christ
King Benjamin's reign radiates with the brightness, hope, and love of a righteous Christian king. King Benjamin showed how the mysteries of God and service are interrelated.

“What Parents Should Teach Their Children from the Book of Mosiah,” Kenneth W. Anderson, in The Book of Mormon: Mosiah, Salvation Only Through Christ
Children can learn to love God and Christ, to love the scriptures, the characteristics of a disciple of Christ, and to make covenants. 

Chart 85: "King Benjamin's Coronation of Mosiah," Charting the Book of Mormon
The coronation of Mosiah by King Benjamin was a ceremonial event that parallels the installation of kings in ancient Israel and other Near Eastern countries of antiquity, suggesting that the Nephites continued to practice Old World traditions in the Americas.

Chart 87: "Overview of Benjamin's Speech," Charting the Book of Mormon
This chart is an outline of the chiastic nature of King Benjamin's speech, identifying seven sections separated by interruptions or intervening ceremonial acts. 

"When Pages Collide: Dissecting the Words of Mormon," Jack M. Lyon and Kent R. Minson, BYU Studies Quarterly, Vol. 51, no. 4
The authors propose that Words of Mormon verses 12-18 are actually part of the book of Mosiah, due to a gap caused by the lost manuscript pages.