Biographical Registers - B

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Babbit, Alman (Almon) (1813-56), was born in 1813 in Massachusetts to Ira Babbitt and Nancy Crosier. Married Julia Ann Johnson on Nov. 23, 1833, and they had six children. Probably was baptized in 1833. Marched with Zion’s Camp in 1834. Was an elder when he attended and participated in the meetings McLellin held in Amherst, Ohio, during Oct. 1834. Donated money to McLellin. Was ordained a seventy by Joseph Smith on Feb. 28, 1835, and later was ordained a high priest. Served a mission to Ontario, Canada, 1837-38. President of the Kirtland Stake, 1841-43. Practiced law and frequently defended the Mormon right to Nauvoo. Signed treaty surrendering Nauvoo. Disfellowshipped in 1839, 1841, 1843, and 1851, each time quickly resolving his transgressions. Moved to Utah by 1855 and became active in politics there until he was attacked and killed by Cheyenne Indians in the fall of 1856. [McLellin]

Babbit, Almira (1810-45), is Almira Castle born on Feb. 6, 1810, in Pompey, New York, to Horace and Susan Castle. Married Lorin Whiting Babbit, and they had five children. Donated money to McLellin in Amherst, Ohio, in Oct. 1834. Baptized before 1836. Died Aug. 8, 1845, in Nauvoo. [McLellin]

Babbit, Lorin Whiting (1806-83), was born in Sept. 1806 in New Marlborough, Massachusetts, to William Babbit and Lydia Bishop. Married Almira Castle, and they had five children. Was an elder who attended and participated in the meetings McLellin held in Amherst, Ohio, during Oct. 1834. Was ordained a seventy and served a mission to Ohio in 1844. Shareholder in the Kirtland Safety Society and member of the Second Quorum of the Seventy in Kirtland. Served as a probate judge in Beaver, Utah. Joined the Reorganized Church in Apr. 1863. Died on Aug. 22, 1883, in Stewartsville, Missouri. [McLellin]

Babbitt, Almon W. (1813-1856), attorney. Born at Cheshire, Berkshire County, Massachusetts. Converted to Mormonism, 1833. Married Julia Ann Johnson, 1834. Participant in the march of Zion’s Camp to Missouri later that same year. Proselyting mission to Upper Canada, 1837-1838. Appointed president of Kirtland Stake, 1841. Presiding elder at Ramus, Hancock County, Illinois, 1843. Elected to Illinois state legislature from Hancock County, 1844. Appointed to the committee to sell the property of Latter-day Saints departing from Nauvoo, 1845; and postmaster of Nauvoo, 1846. Crossed the plains to Utah in 1848. Disfellowshipped, 1851. Appointed secretary of Utah Territory, 1852. Killed by Cheyenne Indians in Nebraska. [PJSv1]

Babbitt, Almon W. (1813-1856), attorney. Born at Cheshire, Berkshire County, Massachusetts. Converted to Mormonism, 1833. Married Julia Ann Johnson, 1834. Participant in the march of Zion’s Camp to Missouri later that same year. Proselyting mission to Upper Canada, 1837-38. Appointed president of Kirtland Stake, 1841. Presiding elder at Ramus, Hancock County, Illinois, 1843. Elected to Illinois state legislature from Hancock County, 1844. Appointed to the committee to sell the property of Latter-day Saints departing from Nauvoo, 1845; and postmaster of Nauvoo, 1846. Crossed the plains to Utah in 1848. Disfellowshipped, 1851. Appointed secretary of Utah Territory, 1852. Killed by Cheyenne Indians in Nebraska. [PJSv2]

Babbitt, Almon Whiting. Son of Ira and Nancy Babbitt. Born 1 October 1812 in Cheshire, Berkshire County, Massachusetts. Baptized 1833. Member of Zion’s Camp 1834. Ordained seventy February 1835. Tried before Kirtland high council 19 August 1835 for not keeping Word of Wisdom and for stating that Book of Mormon not essential to salvation of Saints but that Bible was only scripture of their faith. Forgiven upon confession. Tried before Kirtland High Council on 28 December 1835 for traducing character of Joseph Smith. Forgiven upon confession 2 January 1836. Mission to Upper Canada 1837-38. Arrived in Caldwell County, Missouri, with company of Canadian Saints July 1838. Expelled from Missouri 1839. Appointed with others 4 May 1839 to gather libelous reports and publications against Church. Tried by Nauvoo high council on 5 September 1840 for making false statements against Joseph Smith. Acquitted 6 September 1840. Appointed president of Kirtland Stake 22 May 1841. Disfellowshipped 2 October 1841 for teaching and promoting building up of Kirtland as place of gathering, instead of Nauvoo, Illinois. Subsequently made satisfaction. Moved to Illinois in 1842. Appointed presiding elder of Ramus, Illinois, branch of Church 13 March 1843. Disfellowshipped March-April 1843 for impropriety. Restored to fellowship 10 April 1843. Appointed to serve mission to France 6 May 1844; did not fulfill assignment. Elected to state legislature, representing Hancock County, Illinois, 1844. Received endowment 12 May 1844. Member of Council of Fifty by 11 April 1844. Attorney by profession. Frequently employed as counsel for Church. Sealed to Julia Ann Johnson (born 1809 in Vermont) 24 January 1846. Date of civil marriage not known. Three known children: Don Carlos, Almon W., and Julia. Sealed to Mary Tulley (born 1810 in England) 24 January 1846. Sealed to Dulcena Didamia Johnson Sherman for time 24 January 1846. Remained in Nauvoo after Mormon exodus to take charge of Mormon property there. Involved in battle at Nauvoo in September 1846. Signed treaty by which Saints agreed to surrender city to non-Mormons. To Utah 1848. Elected delegate to Congress for provisional State of Deseret 1849. Left for Washington, D.C., in fall of 1849. Not seated. Residing in Nauvoo 1850. Disfellowshipped in Kanesville, Iowa, May 1851 for immorality and intemperance. Appointed secretary of Utah Territory 1852. Left Utah for Washington, D.C., 22 April 1856 to purchase supplies for new statehouse in Salt Lake City. Returning to Utah, killed 7 September 1856 by Cheyenne Indians at Ash Hollow, Nebraska. [Cook]

Babcock, Caroline L., was baptized and confirmed on May 11, 1835, by Orson Hyde near Westfield, New York. [McLellin]

Babcock, Phoebe Anne. See Patton, Phoebe Ann Babcock

Bacheler, Origen (1799-?), born at Sutton, Worcester, Massachusetts. Married Charlotte Thompson, 1828. Baptist minister. Wrote Mormonism Exposed, Internally and Externally, 1838. In New York, lecturing against Mormons with John C. Bennett, 1842. [PJSv2]

Backenstos, Jacob (1811-1857), merchant; born in Dauphin County, Pennsylvania. Married Sarah Lavina Lee, neice of Robert E. Lee, 1836. Living in Sangamon County, Illinois by 1840. Clerk of the Hancock County, Illinois circuit court, 1843-45. Elected to the Illinois legislature, 1844, and Hancock County sheriff, 1845. Backenstos became an army officer in 1846 and participated in the war with Mexico. He became a Lt. Colonel of the 2nd Brigade, Illinois Mounted Rifles, and was wounded in the battle of Chapultepec. Traveled to Oregon with the Mounted Rifles in 1849, resigning in 1851. Living in Oregon City, Clackamas County, 1850. Committed suicide by drowning himself in the Willamette River near Portland in 1857. [PJSv2]

Badlam, Alexander (1808-1894), coachmaker. Born at Norfolk, Norfolk County, Massachusetts. Married Mary Ann Brannan, sister of Samuel Brannan. Participant in Zion’s Camp, 1834. Appointed to the First Quorum of Seventy, 1835. Presided over Boston branch of the Church, 1846-1848. Migrated to Utah, 1850. Mission to California, 1852; studying Chinese in Sacramento, 1853-1855. President of Sixth Quorum of Seventy. By 1872 he had left the Church. [PJSv1]

Badlam, Alexander (1808-1894), coachmaker; born at Norfolk, Norfolk County, Massachusetts. Married Mary Ann Brannan, sister of Samuel Brannan. Participant in Zion’s Camp, 1834. Appointed to the first quorum of Seventy, 1835. Presided over Boston branch of the Church, 1846-48. Migrated to Utah, 1850. Mission to California, 1852; studying Chinese in Sacramento, 1853-55. President of 6th quorum of Seventy. By 1872 he had left the Church. [PJSv2]

Bagby, Walter (?-c.1845), one of the early settlers of Carthage, Hancock County, Illinois. Publisher of The Echo (Carthage, Illinois), 1837. Treasurer of Hancock County, 1834-37. School Commissioner of Hancock County, 1840-41. Member of the Carthage Greys of the Illinois militia. Moved to Louisiana, where he died. [PJSv2]

Bailey, Hannah Boutwell. See Boutwell, Hannah

Bailey, Henry, Sr., was baptized and confirmed by McLellin on Sept. 10, 1834. According to census records, he and his family of three were living in Eugene, Indiana by 1830. [McLellin]

Bailey, Joshua (1772?-1849), born at Andover, Essex County, Massachusetts. Married Hannah Boutwell. Died at Dracut, Middlesex County, Massachusettes. [PJSv1]

Bailey, Lydia Goldthwaite. See Goldthwaite, Lydia

Bailey, Lydia Goldthwaite. See Knight, Lydia Goldthwaite Bailey

Bailey, Mary (1808-1841), born at Bedford, Hillsborough County, New Hampshire. Converted to Mormonism in Boston by Orson Hyde and Samuel Harrison Smith, 1832. Married Samuel H. Smith on 13 August 1834. Mother of four children. Died at Nauvoo, Illinois. [PJSv1]

Baily, Louisa, was baptized by McLellin on Aug. 5, 1834, in Eugene, Indiana. [McLellin]

Baird, Samuel, was a cousin to McLellin who sent him a letter from Canterville, Missouri, which McLellin received on May 17, 1833. [McLellin]

Baker, Colonel Edward D. (1811-61), born in London, England. Came to Illinois in 1815. Admitted to the bar in Carrollton, Illinois, 1830. Married Mary Ann Lee, 1831. Became a Campbellite, 1831. Never became a formal minister but did become a very popular speaker. Active in the Black Hawk War, 1832. Hosted McLellin and Parley Pratt on Mar. 20, 1833. They attended a meeting at which Baker preached in Greene County, Illinois. Moved to Springfield, Illinois, and became close friends with Abraham Lincoln, 1835. Elected to the Illinois House of Representatives, 1837. Elected to the Illinois Senate, 1840. Defeated Abraham Lincoln, who named his son after Baker, for the Whig nomination to Congress, 1844. Active in the Mexican War. Moved to Galena to allow Lincoln a political chance, 1848. Served as superintendent of the Construction of the Panama Railroad, 1851. Died in Balls Bluff, Virginia, during the Civil War, Oct. 21, 1861. Marble statue entitled Baker stands in the United States White House. There are two Mr. Bakers listed in Carrollton, Illinois, in 1830. [McLellin]

Baker, Elizabeth, married Thomas Carrico, in Kirtland, Ohio, 1836. [PJSv2]

Baker, Jesse. Born 23 January 1778. Married Sarah (born 22 May 1782). Joined Church by 1837. Ordained elder 1837. Charter member of and owned stock in Kirtland Safety Society January 1837. Member of Kirtland Camp 1838. Expelled from Missouri 1838-39. Signed petition to Congress for redress of Missouri grievances 29 November 1839. Appointed by revelation 19 January 1841 to be counselor to John A. Hicks in elders quorum in Nauvoo. Received endowment 15 December 1845. [Cook]

Baldwin, Wheeler. Born 1 or 7 March 1793 at Albany County, New York. Living in Strongsville, Cuyahoga County, Ohio, in 1830. Married Mary (born 20 July 1793). Baptized 8 January 1831. Ordained elder before 3 June 1831. Ordained high priest 3 June 1831 by Lyman Wight. Appointed to travel to Missouri June 1831; apparently did not go. Attended Orange, Ohio, conference 25-26 October 1831; there stated he rejoiced to hear testimonies of those who had been "up to the land of Zion." Moved to Jackson County, Missouri, by 5 October 1832. Settled in Caldwell County, Missouri, by 1836; owned property. Located in Lee County, Iowa, after Mormon expulsion from Missouri 1839. On 6 March 1840, Iowa high council appointed Wheeler Baldwin, Lyman Wight, and Abraham O. Smoot to obtain affidavits and other documents to be forwarded to Washington, D.C. Received endowment 7 January 1846 in Nauvoo Temple. Did not move to Utah. Joined Alpheus Cutler’s group in Mills County, Iowa, about 1852. Moved with Cutlerites to Manti, Fremont County, Iowa, in 1854. Joined Reorganized Church in March 1863. Presided over Reorganized Church branches in the counties of Mills, Fremont, Taylor, and Page (Iowa). Died 11 May 1887, near Stewartsville, Missouri. [Cook]

Barden, Jerusha. See Smith, Jerusha Barden

Bardsley/Beardslee, Andrew, born in the 1780s, was living in Kirtland, Ohio at the time of the 1820-40 U.S. censuses. [PJSv2]

Barker, Elizabeth, is listed as a subscriber to the Messenger and Advocate in 1836. Located in Ohio, possibly Fulton, Ohio. [McLellin]

Barker, R., was baptized by McLellin on Jan. 18, 1835, in Huntsburg, Ohio. [McLellin]

Barkshire, Garret W., encouraged McLellin to stay in Crittenden, Kentucky, to answer the opposition’s claims in 1836. Listed as a subscriber to the Messenger and Advocate in Crittenden. [McLellin]

Barnard, John Porter (1803-1874), blacksmith; born at New Hartford, Oneida County, New York. Married Eliza Ann Wycoff, 1826. Converted to Mormonism, 1835. Migrated to Utah, 1848. Died at Harper, Box Elder County, Utah. [PJSv2]

Barnes, Amanda. See Smith, Amanda Barnes

Barney, Edson (1806-1905), was born June 30, 1806, in Ellisburg, New York, to Royal Barney and Rachel Marsh. Married Lillis Ballow on Jan. 1, 1831, and they had seven children. Baptized in May 1831 by Simeon Carter. Was ordained a teacher in 1832 and a priest in 1833. Marched in Zion’s Camp in 1834. Donated money to McLellin in Amherst, Ohio, in Oct. 1834. Was ordained a seventy in 1835. Worked as a carpenter on the Kirtland Temple and was a stockholder in the Kirtland Safety Society. Served as a captain in the Nauvoo Legion. Served a mission to the eastern states in 1844 and three other missions by 1861 to the western territories. Came to Utah in 1851 where he died on Feb. 2, 1905. [McLellin]

Barney, Royal, Jr. (1808-90), was born in Dec. 1808 in Ellisburgh, New York, to Royal Barney and Rachel Marsh. Married Sarah Bowen Esterbrook on Nov. 4, 1829, and they had six children. Baptized in May 1831 by Simeon Carter. Was a deacon who lived in Amherst, Ohio, 1830-38, where he donated money to McLellin. Marched with Zion’s Camp in 1834 and was ordained a member of the First Quorum of Seventy in Apr. 1835. Farmer. Lived in Freeport, Indiana, 1840-43. Migrated to Utah in 1852 where he died in 1890. [McLellin]

Barnum hosted McLellin and Samuel Smith while living in Braceville, Ohio, Nov. 1831. After they preached in his home, his daughter, Irene, wished to join the new church but he would not allow this; he became angry and bitter toward McLellin and Smith. Possibly Samuel Barnum. [McLellin]

Barnum, Irene, converted by McLellin and Samuel Smith’s sermon in Nov. 1831. Was the daughter of the Mr. Barnum whom McLellin met on Nov. 21, 1831. [McLellin]

Barnum, Job V. (1788-?), hotelkeeper; born at Monkton, Addison County, Vermont. Affiliated with the Latter-day Saints in Nauvoo. Left the Church and in 1857 was an apostle in Charles B. Thompson’s, Jehovah’s Presbytery of Zion. Residing in Nebraska in 1860. [PJSv2]

Barrows, Amelia (Emily) Waterman (b. 1782), who was born on Nov. 17, 1782, in Norwich, Vermont, to Daniel Waterman and Phebe House. Married Jacob Barrows on May 27, 1814. Baptized by McLellin on July 27, 1835, in Dalton, New Hampshire. Mother of Ethan Barrows. [McLellin]

Barrows, Ethan (1817-1904), was born on Jan. 12, 1817, in Dalton, New Hampshire, to Jacob Barrows and Amelia (Emily) Waterman. Baptized by McLellin on July 27, 1835, in Dalton, New Hampshire. Labored as a merchant and married Lorena Covey. Was ordained a seventy in Dec. 1840. Signed the 1843 Scroll Petition for Missouri redress. Died in Apr. 1904 in Salt Lake City. [McLellin]

Bassett, Heman. Born 1814. Baptized and ordained elder by spring of 1831. One of first to withdraw from Church in Ohio. Active participant in abnormal spiritual activities in Kirtland, Ohio, early 1831. Living in unauthorized communal order in Kirtland area prior to Prophet’s arrival from Fayette, New York, February 1831. By May 1831 had declared Mormonism hoax. Revelation received 6 June 1831 instructed Joseph Smith, "In consequence of transgression, let that which was bestowed upon Heman Bassett be taken from him." Died 1876 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. [Cook]

Bates, Sarah Marinda. See Pratt, Sarah Marinda Bates

Bean, Daniel, was baptized and was ordained an elder by Horace Cowan in Letter B, Maine, on Mar. 23, 1833. Blessed children with McLellin in Errol, New Hampshire, Aug. 17, 1835. Traveled with McLellin and attended the Farmington Conference in New Hampshire, Aug. 1835. At a conference in Maine, in Aug. 1836, he was appointed clerk and also represented the Errol, New Hampshire, and Newry, Maine, branches. [McLellin]

Beebe, Calvin (1800-61), was born on July 1, 1800, in Paris, New York. Married Submit Starr on Nov. 19, 1823, in Ohio. Moved to Jackson County, Missouri, by 1831 and Clay County, Missouri, by 1833. Held a meeting with Peter Whitmer in Missouri at George Seely’s prior to McLellin’s arrival on Mar. 1, 1833. Was ordained a high priest on Oct. 5, 1832, in Independence, Missouri, and began a mission with Daniel Cathcart to Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, and Ohio. Served as clerk in a conference held on Sept. 26, 1833. Traveled with Isaac Morley from Missouri to Ohio. Served as member of the Far West High Council. Operated a mercantile business, 1837-38. Excommunicated and joined the Reorganized Church. Died on July 12, 1861. [McLellin]

Beemer, Philip (1789-?), born at Grimsby, Ontario, Canada. Married Mary Ann Bloomfield, 1816. Militia officer in the War of 1812. Proprietor of a traveler’s hostel in Colborne, Norfolk, Ontario, Canada. [PJSv2]

Bellew hosted two appointments while living in Greene County, Illinois, May 1833. [McLellin]

Beman, Alvah (1775-1837) was born at New Marlboro, Berkshire County, Massachusetts. Married Sally Burtts in 1796. Moved from Massachusetts to Livonia, Livingston County, New York, 1799. Had a large farm, sheep, cattle; made cloth. Later the family moved to Avon, Livingston County, New York. He was among the first to be acquainted with Joseph Smith and his work in Palmyra, New York. Assisted Joseph in concealing Book of Mormon plates from a Palmyra mob. In 1830 he and his family of six, including four daughters, resided at Livonia, New York. Appointed to preside over elders of the Church at Kirtland, 1836. Died at Kirtland, Ohio. [PJSv1]

Beman, Alvah (1775-1837), born at New Marlboro, Berkshire County, Massachusetts. Married Sally Burtts in 1796. Moved from Massachusetts to Livonia, Livingston County, New York, 1799. He had a large farm, sheep, cattle; made cloth. Later the family moved to Avon, Livingston County, New York. Among the first to be acquainted with Joseph Smith and his work in Palmyra, New York. Assisted Joseph in concealing Book of Mormon plates from a Palmyra mob. In 1830 he and his family of six, including four daughters, resided at Livonia, New York. Appointed to preside over elders of the Church at Kirtland, 1836. Died at Kirtland, Ohio. [PJSv2]

Benbow, John (1800-1874), born at Grendon-Warren, Herefordshire, England. Married Jane Holmes. Baptized by Wilford Woodruff in 1840. Well-to-do farmer who contributed substantially to the Church. Emigrated to America, 1840. Settled on a 160 acre farm on the outskirts of Nauvoo, Illinois. Crossed the plains to Utah in 1848. Living at South Cottonwood at the time of his death. [PJSv2]

Bennet, James Arlington (1788-1865), born in New York. A lawyer, studied medicine, lectured on bookkeeping in New York. He was a second lieutenant of artillery in 1814. Appointed inspector-general of the Nauvoo Legion, 1842. Proprietor of the Arlington Academy at New Utrecht, King’s County, Long Island, 1843. Joined the Latter-day Saints, 1843, but left the Church soon after the death of Joseph Smith. He was Joseph Smith’s first choice as Vice-Presidential running mate in the 1844 Presidential election. Living at Gravesend, King’s County, New York in 1860. [PJSv2]

Bennett was a Campbellite Priest with whom McLellin spent time talking in Jan. 1832. McLellin took him to visit the Prophet. Located in Kirtland, Ohio. [McLellin]

Bennett, Esquire William T., fed dinner to McLellin and others in Shelby County, Illinois, Aug. 3, 1831. Possibly William Bennett, who was a supervisor for Ash Grove in Shelby County, Illinois, 1860-61. [McLellin]

Bennett, James Gordon (1795-1872), newspaper editor; born at Newmill, Banffshire, Scotland. Emigrated to America in 1819. Correspondent with and editor of various New York newspapers until 1835, when he founded The New York Herald. Pioneered many of the methods of modern journalism, including the first financial article, the establishment of European correspondents, and the introduction of a society department. During the Civil War maintained a staff of 63 war correspondents. Throughout his newspaper career he published numerous articles about the Mormons. A resolution of the Nauvoo City Council expressed "lasting gratitude" to the "honorable editor" for his fair treatment of the Mormons. Bennett died in New York City. [PJSv2]

Bennett, John Cook (1804-1867), physician; born at Fairhaven, Bristol County, Massachusetts. Living in Ohio when he married Mary Barker, and later separated. Studied medicine and assisted in founding the medical college at Willoughby, 1834. Moved to Illinois, 1838, and practiced medicine. Appointed brigadier general in the Illinois Militia, 1839, and shortly after, quartermaster general of the state. Moved to Nauvoo and joined the Latter-day Saints, 1840. Instrumental in obtaining the Nauvoo charter. Elected the town’s first mayor, chancellor of the University, major-general of the Nauvoo Legion, and assistant president to Joseph Smith. Appointed master in chancery for Hancock County, Illinois. Excommunicated for immorality, 1842. Published and lectured against the Church. Engaged in poultry raising in Massachusetts; developed the Plymouth Rock chicken. Moved to Iowa and practiced medicine until his death in Polk City. [PJSv2]

Bennett, John Cook. Son of John Bennett and Abagail Cooke. Born 4 August 1804 at Fairhaven, Bristol County, Massachusetts. Early childhood in Washington County, Ohio. Married Mary A. Barker of Washington County, Ohio. Two known children: one son, who graduated from West Point, and one daughter. Later separated. Studied medicine under Dr. Samuel Preston Hildreth of Marietta, Ohio. Licensed as physician by Twelfth District Medical Society 1 November 1825. Practiced medicine in Ohio and West Virginia 1825-32. Initiated into Masonry in Ohio 1826. After obtaining charter, with others founded nonsectarian Christian College in New Albany, Indiana. Name of college changed to Indiana University. Gave instruction, but sold many diplomas. After two years in Indiana, returned to Ohio. Married Sarah Ryder (born 1809 to Job Ryder and Sarah Cassidy). Published articles in the Western Journal of the Medical and Physical Sciences 1830. In 1834 employed as agent to solicit funds for Willoughby University of Lake Erie, incorporated March 1834. Assisted in founding medical college at Willoughby in fall of 1834. Dismissed by March 1835 but retained title of Professor of Midwifery, Diseases of Women and Children, and Medical Jurisprudence. Published The Accouchers Vade Mecum in 1837. Moved to Illinois 1838; practiced medicine for two years at Fairfield, Wayne County. Appointed brigadier general of Second Division of Illinois Militia by Governor Thomas Carlin 20 February 1839. Appointed quartermaster general of State of Illinois by Carlin 20 July 1840. Active in founding Illinois State Medical Society 1840. Moved to Nauvoo September 1840. Baptized about September 1840. Instrumental in obtaining charters for City of Nauvoo, Nauvoo Legion, and University of Nauvoo in December 1840. Elected first mayor of Nauvoo, chancellor of University of Nauvoo, and major-general of Nauvoo Legion. Appointed assistant president to Joseph Smith 8 April 1841. (This position to be temporary, until Sidney Rigdon recovered from illness.) Appointed master in chancery for Hancock County, Illinois, by Stephen A. Douglas 6 May 1841. Interested in tomato for medicinal use. Resigned office of mayor of Nauvoo 17 May 1842. Excommunicated 25 May 1842 for adultery and teaching that illicit intercourse was condoned by Church leaders. While in Nauvoo wrote articles defending Church under pen name of Joab. Left Nauvoo by June 1842. Published The History of the Saints; or, An Expose of Joe Smith and Mormonism (Boston: Leland & Whiting, 1842). Lectured against Church after excommunication. Associated with James J. Strang after Prophet’s death. Organized poultry show in Boston 1849. Had moved to Plymouth, Massachusetts, by 1850. Originated Plymouth Rock chicken. Published The Poultry Book: A Treatise on Breeding and General Management of Domestic Fowls (Boston: Phillips, Sampson and Co., 1856). Moved to Madison Township, Polk County, Iowa, by 1860; there practiced medicine. Wife died 15 July 1863 and buried at Polk City, Iowa. Died 5 August 1867; buried at Polk City, Polk County, Iowa. [Cook]

Bennett, Samuel C. (1810-?) barometer maker; born in England. After joining the Latter-day Saints, he was presiding elder of the branch at Cincinnati, Ohio in 1840. Elected market inspector and alderman at Nauvoo, Illinois, 1843, and associate justice of the municipal court, 1844. Held commission as doctor in Nauvoo Legion. Among those arrested for destruction of the Nauvoo Expositor in June 1844. After the death of Joseph Smith he was associated with Sidney Rigdon and James J. Strang. Editor of Rigdon’s Messenger and Advocate, 1845. Residing in Allegheny County, Pennsylvania in 1860. [PJSv2]

Bennett, Selina (1815-?), born in England. Wife of Samuel C. Bennett. [PJSv2]

Benson, Ezra Taft. Son of John and Chloe Benson. Born 22 February 1811 in Mendon, Worcester County, Massachusetts. Married Pamelia Andrus 1 January 1832. Eight children: Chloe Jane, Adin Parsons, Jonathan, Harvey, Charles Taft, Emma Parsons, Isabella, and Charlotte Taft. Baptized 19 July 1840 in Quincy, Illinois. Ordained elder 3-5 October 1840 by Elisha H. Groves at Nauvoo, Illinois. Ordained high priest by Hyrum Smith 25 October 1840 in Quincy. Appointed member of stake presidency in Quincy, Illinois, 25 October 1840. Moved to Nauvoo April 1841. Mission to eastern states 1842-43. Left Nauvoo 1 June 1842. Returned to Nauvoo in fall of 1843. Sealed to Adaline Brooks Andrus (plural wife) on 27 April 1844. Three children: George Taft, Florence Adeline, and Frank. Mission to East May 1844. Returned to Nauvoo in fall of 1844. Appointed member of Nauvoo high council 7 October 1844. Mission to East December 1844. Presided over Boston conference until May 1845. Received endowment 15 December 1845. Sealed in Nauvoo Temple to Pamelia Andrus 16 January 1846. Sealed in Nauvoo Temple to Adaline Brooks Andrus 16 January 1846. Sealed in Nauvoo Temple to Desdemona Catlin Fullmer for time 26 January 1846. Left Nauvoo for West February 1846. Appointed counselor to William Huntington in Mt. Pisgah 22 May 1846. Moved to Council Bluffs 1846. Ordained apostle 16 July 1846. Mission to East; returned 27 November 1846. Sealed to Eliza Perry 4 March 1847, at Council Bluffs, Iowa. Seven children: Alice Eliza, John Perry, Malina A., Orion W., Carrie S., Abbie Della, and Grace A. Arrived in Salt Lake Valley 24 July 1847. Returned to Winter Quarters 1847. Mission to East 1847-48. Presided over Church membership in Pottawattamie County, Iowa, with Orson Hyde and George A. Smith 1848. Moved to Salt Lake Valley 1849. Member of provisional State of Deseret legislature 1849. Mission to Pottawattmie County 1851 to gather remaining Saints. Returned to Utah August 1852. Sealed to Mary Knight about 1852. Seven children: Louise, Heber, Moroni, Lorenzo T., Joseph, Ida, Don Carlos. Married Elizabeth Golliaher 5 June 1852. Seven children: Fred Golliaher, Brigham Young, Luella, William C., Hyrum Smith, Edith, and Lizzie. Mission to Europe 1856. With Orson Pratt, presided over British mission until fall of 1857. Returned to Salt Lake Valley 1857. Member of Utah Territorial House of Representatives 1859-69. Appointed to preside over Church in Cache Valley, Utah, 1860. Resided in Cache Valley until death at Logan. Mission to Sandwich Islands 1864-65. Married Mary Larsen 3 September 1866. Two children: Walter and Henry T. Contractor on Central Pacific Railroad. Died 3 September 1869 in Ogden, Weber County, Utah. [Cook]

Bent, Samuel. Son of Joel Bent. Born 19 July 1778 at Barre, Worcester County, Massachusetts. Married Mary Hilbourne (born 1785 in Vermont) about 1805. Four known children: William, Joseph, Horatio, and Mary. Member of Congregationalist and Presbyterian churches before conversion to Mormonism. Colonel in Massachusetts Militia. Learned of Mormonism from Elmira Scobie. Baptized by Jared Carter in Pontiac, Michigan, January 1833. Ordained elder day of baptism. Mission to Michigan January 1833. Visited Kirtland 1833. Member of Zion’s Camp 1834. Attended School of Prophets 1835. Attended Kirtland Temple dedication March 1836. Moved to Clay County, Missouri, 1836. After death of wife, Mary, married Lettice Palmer (widow of Ambrose Palmer) September 1837. Located near Far West, Missouri, 1836. Appointed member of Far West high council 6 October 1838. Expelled from Missouri 1839. Located in Nauvoo 1839. Appointed member of Nauvoo high council 6 October 1839. Sent on mission to collect money for printing purposes 17 July 1840. Traveled in Illinois, Indiana, and Ohio. Member of Nauvoo Legion. Member of Council of Fifty 19 March 1844. Mission to Michigan 1844. Received endowment 13 December 1845. Sealed to Lettice Palmer for time 14 January 1846. Sealed in Nauvoo Temple to Cynthia Noble (born 1806 in New York) 14 January 1846. Sealed in Nauvoo Temple to Mariah Thompson (born 1808 in Vermont) 14 January 1846. Sealed to Asenath Slafter (born 1796 in Connecticut) 28 January 1846. Sealed to Elizabeth Burgess (born 1789 in Massachusetts) 28 January 1846. Sealed to Polly Smith for time 30 January 1846. Left Nauvoo for West 1846. Appointed to preside over Church at Garden Grove, Iowa. Died 16 August 1846 at Garden Grove, Iowa. [Cook]

Benton, Abram Willard (1805-1867), physician, studied medicine with Dr. Nathan Boynton at Bettsburgh and settled in Afton, Chenango County, New York, where he practised several years. In 1830 he was a member of the Chenango County Medical Society. Seven years later he sold out and moved to Illinois. Became a director of the Mississippi and Rock River Junction Railroad, 1852. Died at Fulton, Whiteside County, Illinois. While in New York he wrote his perceptions of Joseph Smith, including a summary of the 1830 Bainbridge trial, in a letter to the editors of the Evangelical Magazine and Gospel Advocate in Utica, New York. His piece appeared under the title "Mormonites" in the issue of 9 April 1831. [PJSv1]

Bernhisel, John Milton. (1799-1881), physician, political economist, Congressional delegate. Born at Lloysville, Perry County, Pennsylvania. Graduated from University of Pennsylvania in medicine. While practicing medicine in New York he joined the Latter-day Saints. Elected bishop in 1841. Moved to Nauvoo, 1843, where he resided in the Mansion House. Married Julia Ann Van Orden, 1845. Crossed the plains to Utah in 1847-48. Member of the Board of Regents of the University of Deseret, 1850-58. Between 1849 and 1863 he spent most of his time in Washington, D.C., representing Utah in Congress. After returning to Utah he continued to practice medicine, and was vice-president of ZCMI, a member of the Council of Fifty, and participated in the School of the Prophets and the United Order. He died in Salt Lake City. [PJSv2]

Bidamon, Emma Hale Smith. Daughter of Isaac Hale and Elizabeth Lewis. Born 10 July 1804 at Harmony, Susquehanna County, Pennsylvania. Married Joseph Smith, Jr., 18 January 1827 at South Bainbridge, Chenango County, New York. Nine children: Alvin, Thaddeus, Louisa, Joseph, Frederick Granger Williams, Alexander Hale, Don Carlos, male child, and David Hyrum. Adopted twins: Joseph and Julia Murdock. Assisted as scribe in translation of Book of Mormon. Baptized 28 June 1830 by Oliver Cowdery. Given revelation July 1830; instructed to prepare hymn book for Church. Confirmed member of Church about 1 August 1830. Moved from Harmony to Fayette, New York, September 1830. Moved with husband to Kirtland, Ohio, January 1831. Resided in Hiram, Ohio, September 1831-September 1832. Moved back to Kirtland, Ohio, September 1832; resided there until 1838. Moved to Far West, Missouri, 1838, arriving in March. Located temporarily near Quincy, Illinois, 1839 after Mormon expulsion from Missouri. Moved to Nauvoo, Illinois, in summer of 1839. Appointed first president of Female Relief Society 17 March 1842. Sealed to Joseph Smith 28 May 1843 and endowed before 28 September 1843. Did not migrate west with main body of Saints 1847. Married Major Lewis C. Bidamon 23 December 1847. No children. Died at Nauvoo, Hancock County, Illinois, 30 April 1879. [Cook] see also Hale, Emma, and Smith, Emma Hale

Billings, Titus (1793-1866), born at Greenfield, Franklin County, Massachusetts. Married Diantha Morley in 1817. One of the first converts to Mormonism in Kirtland, Ohio, 1830. Moved to Jackson County, Missouri, 1832; remained in Missouri until 1838. Participant in the Battle of Crooked River in October 1838. Member of the Nauvoo Legion in Illinois. Crossed the plains to Salt Lake City in 1848. Pioneer settler of Manti, Utah. About 1863 moved to Provo, Utah, where he died. [PJSv1]

Billings, Titus (1793-1866), was born in Mar. 1793 in Greenfield, Massachusetts, to Ebeneezer Billings and Joyce Esther. Married Diantha Morley on Feb. 16, 1817, and they had nine children. Was baptized in Kirtland on Nov. 15, 1830, and was ordained a deacon in Oct. 1831. Hosted meetings in Kirtland, Ohio, Jan. 1832. Immigrated to Missouri early in the spring of 1832. Was ordained an elder by Thomas B. Marsh on Mar. 10, 1832, and a high priest by Edward Partridge and Isaac Morley on Aug. 1, 1837. Delivered a message to McLellin and Parley Pratt to return to Independence, Missouri, in Jan. 1833. Served as counselor to Bishop Partridge and as bishop at Far West. Fought in the 1838 Battle of Crooked River, Missouri, and later served as an officer in the Nauvoo Legion. Worked as a stone mason, carpenter, and musician. Moved to Utah where he died in Provo on Feb. 6, 1866. [McLellin]

Billings, Titus. Son of Ebenezer Billings and Esther Joyce. Born 25 March 1793 in Greenfield, Franklin County, Massachusetts. Married Diantha Morley in Geauga County, Ohio, 16 February 1817. Nine children: Samuel Dwight, Thoma, Ebenezer, Emily, Martha, Alfred Nelson, George Pierce, Eunice, and Titus, Jr. Baptized in Kirtland, Ohio, by Lamanite missionaries about 15 November 1830. Ordained deacon by October 1831. Ordained elder 10 March 1832 by Thomas B. Marsh. Appointed by revelation August 1831 to move to Missouri in spring of 1832. Left for Independence, Missouri, early 1832, arriving before 26 May. Expelled from Jackson County, Missouri, 1833. Settled in Clay County, Missouri, 1833. Ordained high priest and counselor in bishopric in Missouri 1 August 1837. Participated in Battle of Crooked River October 1838. Located in Lima, Adams County, Illinois, after Mormon expulsion from Missouri 1839. Member of Nauvoo Legion 4 February 1841. Moved to Nauvoo 1845. Received endowment 13 December 1845. Sealed in Nauvoo Temple to Diantha Morley 30 January 1846. Moved to Salt Lake Valley 1848. Appointed to settle Sanpete Valley in fall of 1849. One of first settlers of Manti, Utah. Married Mary Ann Tuttle 20 January 1854. Four children: Emily, Titus, Theressa, and Alonzo. Located in Provo, Utah, about 1863. Died in Provo, Utah County, Utah, 6 February 1866. [Cook]

Birch (Berch), James H., hosted McLellin and Parley Pratt while living near the court house in Fayette, Missouri, Feb. 1833. Subscribed to the Star. [McLellin]

BIRCH (Berch), Mrs., hosted McLellin and Parley Pratt in Fayette, Missouri, Feb. 1833. Bought a Book of Mormon. Married James H. Berch. [McLellin]

Bisbee, Harriet Jolly. See Jolly, Harriet

Bishop, Francis Gladden (1809-1878), watch repairer, born at Greece, Monroe County, New York. After joining the Latter-day Saints in July 1832, he was engaged in extensive missionary work from North Carolina to Canada, 1833-1840, and was president of the branch at Westfield, New York. Heretical tendencies and subsequent repentance resulted in excommunication and readmittance to the Church on three occasions. On 28 September 1835 he was charged with "advancing heretical doctrines . . . derogatory to the character of the Church." He was excommunicated in 1842 for purveying his own revelations as doctrine. Later formed a church of his own, which existed in Iowa until about 1860. [PJSv1]

Bishop, Francis Gladden (1809-1878), watch repairer; born at Greece, Monroe County, New York. After joining the Latter-day Saints in July 1832, he was engaged in extensive missionary work from North Carolina to Canada, 1833-40, and was president of the branch at Westfield, New York. Heretical tendencies and subsequent repentance resulted in excommunication and readmittance to the Church on three occasions. On 28 September 1835 he was charged with "advancing heretical doctrines . . . derogatory to the character of the Church." Excommunicated in 1842 for purveying his own revelations as doctrine. Later formed a church of his own that existed in Iowa until about 1860. [PJSv2]

Bissel, Benjamin B. (1805-1878), lawyer, judge; born at Hartwick, Otsego County, New York. Moved to Painesville, Geauga County, Ohio. Married Sarah Bright, 1829. One of a dozen attorneys listed in Geauga County tax records for the 1830s. Partner with Noah D. Matoon, a prominent Painesville lawyer. Defended Joseph Smith in July 1834, and helped him escape from a Painesville mob in 1837. While a state senator, 1839-40, he was instrumental in the creation of Lake County, Ohio. He was district or presiding judge, 1842-46, and was still sitting on the bench in 1857. He died in Painesville. [PJSv2]

Black, Adam (1801-?), farmer; born in Henderson County, Kentucky. Moved to Missouri, 1819; elected sherrif of Ray County, 1824. Married Mary Morgan in Ray County, 1825. Moved to Daviess County in 1834 and settled on land that later became the Mormon town of Adam-ondi-ahman. Served as justice of the peace and County judge in Daviess County and in Gentry County after moving there in 1844. In 1861 moved to Livingstone County where he served as a county judge and was still residing in 1885. [PJSv2]

Blair, A., was an agricultural worker living in Kirtland, Ohio, when McLellin visited him on Dec. 2, 1834. [McLellin]

Blakeslee, James (1802-66), born on July 18, 1802, in Milton, Vermont. Baptized on July 19, 1833, by David W. Patten. Was ordained a priest in July 1833. Was ordained an elder in the spring of 1834 by Thomas Dutcher and a seventy in 1840 by Brigham Young. Served missions in New York and Canada in the 1830s. Was preaching with Elder Dutcher in Sackets Harbor, New York, when McLellin attended their appointment in June 1835. Presided over meetings in Booneville, New York, and was present at a conference held in Sackets Harbor, New York. Presided over branch in Ontario, Canada, in 1837. Sent several letters to church leaders about the success he was seeing. Excommunicated on May 18, 1844, and joined Sidney Rigdon’s church. Became affiliated with James Strang and was eventually baptized into the Reorganized Church on Apr. 8, 1859, and remained an active member until his death on Dec. 18, 1866, in Batavia, Illinois. [McLellin, s.v. "Blakesly"]

Bledsoe hosted McLellin and Parley Pratt in Greene County, Illinois,
Mar. 19, 1833. Could be M. O. Bledsoe or Moses Bledsoe. [McLellin]

Bogart, Samuel (1797-1861), farmer, was born in Carter County, Tennessee. He fought in the Battle of New Orleans in 1815 and the Black Hawk War in 1832. Moved to Missouri, 1833; and Washington County, Texas, 1839. Commanded a company of Rangers in the Mier Expedition into Old Mexico in 1842-1843. Settled in Collin County, Texas, 1845; represented the county in the state legislature, 1847, 1849, 1851, 1859. Died at Woodlawn, Collin County.             Bogart was Captain of Ray County, Missouri volunteers ("minute men") under Hiram G. Parks’s command during the conflict with the Mormons in 1838. He led the force that engaged David Patten’s men at Crooked River on 25 October 1838, which resulted in Patten’s death. [PJSv1]

Boggs, Lilburn W. (1798-1861) was the fifth governor of Missouri, 1837-1841. He was born in Kentucky; moved to Missouri where he engaged in business. Missouri state senator, 1826-32, elected lieutenant-governor in 1832 and became governor upon the resignation of his predecessor, Daniel Dunklin. He played a prominent roll in the expulsion of the Mormons from the state in 1838. He was severely wounded by an assassin in 1842 and accused Joseph Smith of complicity in the crime. In 1846 moved to California, where he became alcalde of the Sonoma district, 1847-1849. He died at Sacramento. [PJSv1]

Boggs, Lilburn W. (1798-1861), born at Lexington, Kentucky. Served in the War of 1812. Moved to St. Louis, Missouri about 1816 and engaged in business. After death of first wife, married Panthea Boone, granddaughter of Daniel Boone. Elected lieutenant-governor, 1832, and became governor upon the resignation of his predecessor, Daniel Dunklin. Played a prominent roll in the expulsion of the Mormons from the state in 1838. Severely wounded by an assassin in 1842 and accused Joseph Smith of complicity in the crime. Moved to California in 1846 and became alcalde of the Sonoma district, 1847-49. He died at Sacramento. [PJSv2]

BOICE hosted an appointment for McLellin in Loughborough, Ontario, Canada on June 26, 1835. [McLellin]

Boice, Margaret, rode on McLellin’s lap to Loughborough, Canada, on June 27, 1835. [McLellin]

Bond, Ira (1798-1887), farmer, born at Caldwell, Essex County, New Jersey. Married Charlotte Wilcox. After moving to Mendon, New York, he was among the first Mormon converts there in 1832. Called to preside over the deacons in Kirtland, 1836. Owned 178 acres and a dwelling house valued at $465 at Kirtland in 1836. Remained in Kirtland after Mormons left, and died there. [PJSv1]

Bond, Ira (1798-1887), farmer; born at Caldwell, Essex County, New Jersey. Married Charlotte Wilcox. After moving to Mendon, New York, he was among the first Mormon converts there in 1832. Called to preside over the deacons in Kirtland, 1836. Owned 178 acres and a dwelling house valued at $465 at Kirtland in 1836. Remained in Kirtland after Mormons left, and died there. [PJSv2]

Bond, Tempreance. See Mack, Temperance Bond

Bondurant, Captain, hosted McLellin in Missouri, Feb. 28, 1833. Two Bondurants are listed in 1830 and 1840 censuses. [McLellin]

Bonham, Mr., hosted McLellin in Missouri, on Sept. 6, 1831, and Feb. 27, 1833. He believed that a number of Adams existed in the creation and also that the Book of Mormon was a "good moral and rule of life." Possibly Jerrimiah Bonhime. [McLellin]

Bonham, Mrs., hosted McLellin in Sept. 1831 and Feb. 1833. [McLellin]

Bonney, Edward (1807-1864), lawyer, adventurer, farmer, born in Essex County, New York. Married Maria L. Van Frank in Homer, New York, 1832. Settled at Montrose, Iowa, about 1834. Counsel for the prosecution when the Nauvoo Expositor case came before Daniel H. Wells, 17 June 1844. Appointed aide-de-camp to Joseph Smith in the Nauvoo Legion, 18 June 1844. Listed as a witness by Joseph for his prospective trial in the Expositor case, 26 June 1844. Apparently affiliated with Mormonism for a while, but did not remain. After the death of the Prophet, he became a self-appointed agent of justice, or bounty-hunter. Instrumental in the arrest and conviction of the Hodge brothers of Nauvoo for the killing of John Miller and Henry Leicy in Lee County, Iowa, in 1845. After the murder of George Davenport at Rock Island, Illinois, in 1845, he volunteered to bring to justice a gang of murderers and thieves operating in the Mississippi Valley. Lived at Rock Island, Prospect Park, York, and Aurora, Illinois. Restaurant keeper at Hannibal, Missouri, in 1860. Joined the Union army during the Civil War and was assigned to the secret service. Died at Chicago, Illinois. Published an account of his adventures under the title The Banditti of the Prairies in the late 1840s. [PJSv1]

Boosinger, George (1784-1861), farmer; born in Tennessee. Census records indicate he was in Ohio by 1827 and Missouri by 1837. In 1850 he was living in Macoupin County, Illinois. [PJSv2]

Boosinger, George (1784-1861), was born in Tennessee. While living near Middlebury, Ohio, he hosted McLellin in Feb. 1832. He was also living there in 1840. Farmer. Filed a petition on Jan. 20, 1840, in Illinois against Ray County, Missouri, for damages. Possibly lived a short while in Ray County, Missouri, during 1836 but was ordained a high priest in Kirtland in 1836 while helping to satisfy the temporal needs of those working on the Kirtland Temple. Performed at least two baptisms in Middlebury, Ohio, which Orson Hyde recorded. [McLellin]

Booth, Ezra (1792-?), born in Connecticut. Married Dorcas Taylor, 1819. A Methodist minister when converted to Mormonism in 1831. He accompanied Isaac Morley to Missouri and attended the August 1831 conference in Jackson County. After returning to Ohio in September, he was called on another mission to Missouri, where he became disaffected and left the Church. Published a series of nine anti-Mormon letters in the Ohio Star in 1831. Residing on a farm in Mantua, Portage County, Ohio in 1860. [PJSv1]

Booth, Ezra. Born in Connecticut 1792. Removed to Nelson, Ohio, by 1819; there married Dorcas Taylor 10 March 1819. Methodist minister. Converted to Church through miraculous healing of Elsa Johnson’s arm about May 1831. Ordained elder before June 1831. Ordained high priest 3 June 1831 by Lyman Wight. Appointed to travel to Missouri with Isaac Morley June 1831. Attended Church conference in Jackson County, Missouri 4 August 1831. Directed to purchase canoes for Ohio elders returning to East. Arrived in Ohio by 1 September 1831. Mission to Missouri; there became disillusioned and lost faith in Joseph Smith’s divine calling. Fellowship withdrawn 6 September 1831. Chastised 11 September 1831, for evil actions. Officially denounced Mormonism 12 September 1831. Considered first Mormon apostate to publish anti-Mormon literature. Authored nine letters against Church; published them in Ohio Star (October-December 1831). Residing in Mantua, Portage County, Ohio, 1860; owned farm. [Cook]

Bosier/Bozarth, Squire (1792-1853), born in Hardin County, Kentucky. Participant in the War of 1812. Married Mildred Willis, 1816. Among the pioneer settlers at La Grange, Lewis County, Missouri, 1819. Converted by George Hinkle and moved to Caldwell County about 1836. After the Mormon exodus from Missouri, he was among the earliest settlers at Commerce, Hancock County, Illinois. In December 1839 the Nauvoo high council authorized him to build a sawmill. Died at Woodland, Washington Territory. [PJSv2]

Bosley, Edmund (1776-1846), born in Northumberland County, Pennsylvania. Residing in Livonia, Livingston County, New York, 1822-30. Moved to Kirtland, Ohio, 1833. Living in Missouri by 1838. Migrated with the Latter-day Saints to Illinois in 1839. Died at Winter Quarters, Nebraska, during the Mormon exodus to Utah. [PJSv2]

Bosley, J., purchased a vest pattern and trimmings for McLellin in Geneseo, New York. A John Bosley is found in the Geneseo, New York, 1830 census. [McLellin]

Bosley, William Bull (1818-42), was born on June 13, 1818, in Lovinia, New York, to Edmund Bosley and Ann Kelly. Helped transport the Twelve from Kirtland to Fairport, Ohio, in May 1835. Was ordained a member of the Second Quorum of Seventy. Married Eleanor (Ellen) Pack on Feb. 22, 1838. Signed Kirtland Camp Constitution in July 1838. Died on June 5, 1842, in Nauvoo. [McLellin]

Bosworth, Joseph (1790-1850), farmer; born at Scituate, Providence County, Rhode Island. Married Lucina Hopkins, 1815. Living in Otsego County, New York by 1816 and Copley, Summit County, Ohio by 1818. Joined the Latter-day Saints by 1834. Died at Copley, Ohio. [PJSv2]

Bosworth, Mary Ann. See Hubbard, Mary Ann Bosworth

BOUCE hosted McLellin near Laona, New York, on May 16, 1835. [McLellin]

Boutwell, Hannah (1773-1835), born at Wilmington, Middlesex County, Massachusetts. Married Joshua Bailey. Died at Dracut, Middlesex County, Massachusetts. [PJSv1]

Bovier, Rhoda Stowell. See Stowell, Rhoda

Bowen, John (1803-1858), farmer; born in Chester County, Pennsylvania. Married Ann Lanbough. In 1847 settled in Montrose, Lee County, Iowa, where he died. [PJSv2]

Boynton, John Farmum (1811-90), was born on Sept. 20, 1811, in Massachusetts to Eliphalet Boynton and Susannah Nichols. Was baptized in Sept. 1832 and ordained an elder that same year. Was McLellin’s missionary companion to Painesville, Ohio, in Nov. 1834. Was ordained an apostle on Feb. 15, 1835. Married Susannah Lowell on Jan. 20, 1836, and they had five children. Served as a missionary with Zebedee Coltrin. Apostatized; was disfellowshipped from the Quorum of Twelve on Sept. 3, 1837. Employed in the invention of torpedoes and other wartime inventions, and by 1886 he had thirty-six patents in the national patent office. Died in Syracuse, New York, on Oct. 20, 1890. [McLellin]

Boynton, John Farnham (1811-1890), merchant, lecturer, scientist, inventor. Born at Bradford (now Groveland) Essex County, Massachusetts. Converted to Mormonism in 1832. Member of the Council of Twelve, 1835-1837. Married Susan Lowell, 1836. Established a mercantile business in Kirtland, Ohio with Lyman Johnson. Left the Church in 1837. Settled in Syracuse, New York. Lecturer on natural history, geology, and science. Delivered more than 4,000 lectures. Sent by U.S. government to California in 1849. Assisted in running boundary line between United States and Mexico. Developed the torpedo that destroyed the Confederate ram Albemarle during U.S. Civil War. Author of 36 patents. Avid collector of Boynton genealogy. Died at Syracuse, New York. [PJSv1]

Boynton, John Farnham (1811-1890), merchant, lecturer, scientist, inventor. Born at Bradford (now Groveland), Essex County, Massachusetts. Converted to Mormonism in 1832. Member of the Council of Twelve, 1835-37. Married Susan Lowell, 1836. Established a mercantile business in Kirtland, Ohio with Lyman Johnson. Left the Church in 1837. Settled in Syracuse, New York. Lecturer on natural history, geology, and science. Delivered more than 4000 lectures. Sent by U.S. government to California in 1849. Assisted in running boundary line between United States and Mexico. Developed the torpedo that destroyed the Confederate ram Albemarle during U.S. Civil War. Author of 36 patents. Avid collector of Boynton genealogy. Died at Syracuse, New York. [PJSv2]

Boynton, Nathan (1788-1860), born in Hampshire County, Massachusetts. Married Lepha Stowell of Bainbridge, Chenango County, New York about 1818. Boynton lived for many years in Chenango County, where he was a prominent physician and lumber dealer. About 1833 he moved to Elmira, Chemung County, New York, where he died. [PJSv1]

Boynton, Susan Lowell. See Lowell, Susan

Bradley, Father S., was preaching when McLellin and Parley Pratt arrived, and he asked them to address his audience near Fayette, Missouri, Feb. 9 [actually Feb. 10], 1833. [McLellin]

Brannan, Samuel (1819-1889), born Saco, York County, Maine. In 1833 he migrated to Kirtland, Ohio, where he worked as a printer. After conversion to Mormonism he served as a missionary. Assisted with Church publication, and presided over the saints in the eastern states, 1845-46. Led a group of saints from New York to San Francisco by ship, 1846-47. After failing to persuade Brigham Young to settle the migrating Latter-day Saints in California in 1847, he returned to the bay area, where he became one of California’s pioneer entrepreneurs. He published the first newspaper in San Francisco. Through extensive merchandising and land holdings he became the state’s first millionaire. Excesses led to his excommunication in 1851. He died insolvent in San Diego. [PJSv2]

Briggs, Mr., was probably a civic figure who lived between Lyman and Dalton, New Hampshire, Aug. 5, 1835. Censuses list several Briggses. [McLellin]

Brockman, S. or L., hosted McLellin overnight in Randolph County, Missouri, Aug. 14, 1831. Possibly Stephen H. or Lindsey E. Brockman. [McLellin]

Brook, Phoebe. See Rigdon, Phoebe Brook

Brooks, Lester (1802-1878), stoveplate molder; born at Lanesboro, Berkshire County, Massachusetts. Married Amy Sophia Hazen, 1828. Counselor in the Kirtland stake presidency, 1841. By 1850 living at Buffalo, Erie County, New York, where he died. [PJSv2]

Brown, Albert (1807-1902), carpenter. Born at Windsor, Hartford County, Connecticut. Living in Hoosick, Rensselaer County, New York, in 1830. Converted to Mormonism, 1832. Participant in march of Zion’s Camp, 1834. Married Sarah Campbell, 1839. Member of the Nauvoo Legion. Migrated to Utah in 1863. He was a patriarch at time of his death in East Mill Creek, Utah. [PJSv1]

Brown, Albert (1807-1902), carpenter; born at Windsor, Hartford County, Connecticut. Living in Hoosick, Rensselaer County, New York, in 1830. Converted to Mormonism, 1832. Participant in march of Zion’s Camp, 1834. Married Sarah Campbell, 1839. Member of the Nauvoo Legion. Migrated to Utah in 1863. He was a patriarch at time of his death at East Mill Creek, Utah. [PJSv2]

Brown, Benjamin (1794-1878), was born on Sept. 30, 1794, in Queensbury, New York, to Asa Brown and Sarah Moon. Married Sarah Mumford on Sept. 12, 1819, and they had five children. After delaying baptism a year to wait for his wife, he was baptized on May 10, 1835, by McLellin in Westfield, New York, and later hosted and donated money to him. Was ordained a high priest. Attended the Kirtland Temple dedication. Said to have been visited by two of the three Nephites. Served several missions. Bishop in Far West and Salt Lake City. Emigrated to Utah in 1848 where he died in Salt Lake City on May 22, 1878. [McLellin]

Brown, Eliza (1808-?), was born in Chenango County, New York. She married William C. Perry, 1835. Resided among the Latter-day Saints with her family in Missouri and Illinois. [PJSv2]

Brown, Eliza (1808-?), was born in Chenango County, New York. She married William C. Perry, 1835. [PJSv1]

Brown, Mr., gave McLellin $.75 in Fredonia, New York, May 5, 1835. [McLellin]

Brown, Mrs., seemed to believe McLellin’s message but was unwilling to be baptized on May 14, 1835. [McLellin]

BROWN, Rebecca, was baptized by McLellin on May 10, 1835, in Westfield, New York. [McLellin]

Brunson, Seymour (1798-1840), born at Plattsburgh, Clinton County, New York. Veteran of War of 1812. Married Harriet Gould, 1820. Joined Latter-day Saints in Ohio in 1831. He was a temporary member of the high council at Far West, Missouri, in 1838 and was appointed to the Nauvoo, Illinois, high council the following year. He was a captain in the 53rd regiment of Missouri militia and lieutenant colonel in the Hancock County, Illinois, militia. Died at Nauvoo. [PJSv1]

Brunson, Seymour (1798-1840), born at Plattsburgh, Clinton County, New York. Veteran of War of 1812. Married Harriet Gould, 1820. Joined Latter-day Saints in Ohio in 1831. Temporary member of the high council at Far West, Missouri in 1838, and appointed to the Nauvoo, Illinois high council the following year. Captain in the 53rd regiment of Missouri militia, and colonel in the Hancock County, Illinois militia. Died at Nauvoo. [PJSv2]

Brunson, Seymour. Son of Reuben Brunson and Sally Clark. Born 18 September 1799 in Virginia. Served in War of 1812. Residing in Mantua, Portage County, Ohio, 1830. Married Harriet Gould before 1830. Four known children: Reuben, Lewis, Joseph, and Seymour. Baptized by Solomon Hancock January 1831. Ordained elder 25 January 1831 by John Whitmer. Appointed by revelation to preach gospel with Daniel Stanton 25 January 1832. Mission with Luke Johnson 1832. After establishing branch of Church in Windsor, Ohio, moved family there. Residing in Kirtland 1835. Temporary member of high council in Far West, Missouri, 1838. Expelled from Missouri 1839. Located in Nauvoo 1839. Appointed member of Nauvoo high council 6 October 1839. Appointed by high council 1 December 1839 to obtain signatures for petition to legislature to define new boundary lines in City of Nauvoo. Colonel in Hancock County Militia. Died 10 August 1840 in Nauvoo, Hancock County, Illinois. At funeral Joseph Smith first publicly announced doctrine of baptism for dead. [Cook]

Bull hosted McLellin on May 2, 1836, in Fulton, Ohio. [McLellin]

Bump, Jacob (1791-186?), born at Butternuts, Otsego County, New York, where he lived until 1824. Participant in Zion’s Camp, 1834. Married Abigail Pettingill. Contracted to do the plastering on the temple at Kirtland, Ohio. Joined dissenters in Kirtland to depose Joseph Smith in 1837. Used his influence with Kirtland dissenters to prevent mob violence against Mormons leaving Kirtland in 1838. In 1837 associated with William E. McLellin and his Church of Christ in Kirtland; still living there in 1860. [PJSv2]

Bump, Jacob (1791-?), born at Butternuts, Otsego County, New York, where he lived until 1824. Participant in Zion’s Camp, 1834. Married Abigail Pettingill. Contracted to do the plastering on the temple at Kirtland, Ohio. Joined dissenters in Kirtland to depose Joseph Smith in 1837. Used his influence with Kirtland dissenters to prevent mob violence against Mormons leaving Kirtland in 1838. He was associated with William E. McLellin and the Church of Christ in Kirtland in 1847 and was still living at Kirtland in 1860. [PJSv1]

Burasus or Burrase was living near Bluffdale, Illinois, when he hosted an appointment, Apr. 1833. Could be William Burriss or John Burruss in Greene County. [McLellin]

Burch, Thomas C. (c1805-1839), lawyer; born in Tennessee. His family moved to Howard County, Missouri when he was a child. Studied law at Jefferson City. In 1831 he began his practice at Richmond, Ray County. Married Celinary Jacobs, 1834. Appointed Judge of the Eleventh Judicial Circuit, 1838. Died at Keytesville, Chariton County, Missouri. [PJSv2]

Burdick, Thomas (1795-1877), farmer, born at Canajoharie, Montgomery County, New York. Married Anna Higley, 1828. Appointed Church clerk to record membership licenses, February 1836. Kirtland schoolteacher, justice of the peace, and member of the Kirtland high council, 1837. Teaching school at Burlington, Iowa, 1845. In 1846 moved to Council Bluffs, where he was clerk and the first judge of Pottawattamie County; also postmaster at Kanesville. Crossed the plains in 1853 to San Bernardino. Moved to San Gabriel. Member of the board of supervisors of Los Angeles County. Died in Los Angeles. His son, Cyrus, was a cofounder of the city of Pomona. [PJSv1]

Burdick, Thomas (1795-1877), farmer; born at Canajoharie, Montgomery County, New York. Married Anna Higley, 1828. Appointed Church clerk to record membership licenses, February 1836. Kirtland school teacher, justice of the peace, and member of the Kirtland high council, 1837. Teaching school at Burlington, Iowa, 1845. In 1846 moved to Council Bluffs, where he was clerk and the first judge of Pottawattamie County; also postmaster at Kanesville. Crossed the plains in 1853 to San Bernardino. Moved to San Gabriel. Member of the board of supervisors of Los Angeles County. Died in Los Angeles. His son, Cyrus, was a co-founder of the city of Pomona. [PJSv2]

Burdock is probably Thomas Burdick (b. 1795), born on Nov. 17, 1795, in Canajoharie, New York, to Gideon Burdick and Catherine Robertson. Taught with McLellin at the Kirtland School. Married Anna Higley. Became a membership license clerk in 1836 in Kirtland and county clerk in Pottawatomie, Iowa, in 1840. Was ordained bishop in Kirtland in 1841. [McLellin]

Burnet, Serenus (1787/8-1858), farmer, born in New Jersey. One of the first settlers at Orange, Cayahoga County, Ohio, in 1815. He remained there until his death. Between 1820 and 1854 he was repeatedly elected to offices of trust, including trustee, treasurer, and clerk of the town. [PJSv1]

Burnett, Edmund Jr., hosted McLellin in Hubbard Town, Ohio, Feb. 1832. [McLellin]

Burnett, Silas, was a Baptist living near Hubbard Town, Ohio, Feb. 17, 1832. [McLellin]

Burnett, Stephen. Son of Sirenus and Jane Burnett. Born 1814 in Ohio. Married to Leonora. Six children: Stephen, Jane, R. (female child), Charles, Emily, and Mary. Longtime resident of Orange, Ohio; there owned property and farmed with father. Baptized about 28 November 1830 by John Murdock. Ordained priest before June 1831. Ordained elder 11 October 1831 by John Whitmer. Conference of Church held in home 25 October 1831. Ordained high priest 25 October 1831 by Oliver Cowdery. Appointed by revelation to take mission with Ruggles Eames 25 January 1832. Appointed by revelation to take mission with Eden Smith March 1832. Preached with Horace Cowen in New Hampshire 14 June-8 July 1833. Became disaffected from Church leadership by late 1837. Publicly denounced Joseph Smith in spring of 1838. In Church publication called "an ignorant little blockhead" 1838. Residing in Orange, Ohio, 1850. [Cook]

Burroughs, Philip. Son of Jonathan Burroughs. Born in New Hampshire about 1795. Elected "overseer of the highways and fence viewer" for Junius, Seneca County, New York, April 1819. Residing in Seneca Falls, Seneca County, New York, 1830. Church meeting held in home September 1830. Apparently, with his wife, member of Church. [Cook]

Burtch, Esther (1816-1896), daughter of Stephen and Margaret Belingar Burtch, born in Mt. Pleasant, Brant County, Ontario, Canada. [PJSv2]

Burtch, Margaret, married Stephen Burtch (b. Balltown, Chautauqua County, New York, 1767), in 1807 in vicinity of Niagara, Canada. Moved with her husband to Mt. Pleasant, Brant County, Ontario in 1813. Parents of nine children, including Mary and Esther Burtch. [PJSv2]

Burtch, Mary, daughter of Stephen and Margaret Belingar Burtch, born in Mt. Pleasant, Brant County, Ontario, Canada. [PJSv2]

Burwell, Celia, was baptized by McLellin and confirmed by Joseph Smith on Dec. 28, 1831, in Weathersfield, Ohio. Married Samuel Burwell. McLellin revisited the Burwells in Wellsville, Ohio, in Apr. 1836. [McLellin]

Burwell, Samuel, was baptized by McLellin on Dec. 14, 1831, in Weathersfield, Ohio. Hosted appointments in Wellsville, Ohio, Apr. 1836. Donated money to McLellin, Apr. 21, 1836. [McLellin]

Butler, John Lowe (1808-1861), farmer, blacksmith; born in Simpson County, Kentucky. Married Caroline F. Skeen, 1831. Baptized by Mormon missionaries, 1835, and moved to Missouri the following year. Involved in the election-day fight at Gallatin, Daviess County, August 1838. Moved to Quincy, Illinois in 1839, and to Nauvoo the following year. Served as a bodyguard of Joseph Smith. Crossed the plains to Utah in 1852. Eventually settled at Spanish Fork, Utah County, where he was bishop of the community from 1856 until his death. [PJSv2]

Butterfield, Betsy, was baptized by Lyman Johnson on May 26, 1835, in Hate, New York. [McLellin]

Butterfield, Josiah (1795-1871), born at Dunstable, Middlesex, Massachusetts. Married Polly Moulton, 1819. Baptized in Maine by Mormon missionaries, 1833 and moved to Kirtland, Ohio. Member of the Kirtland high council and president of the First Quorum of Seventy, 1837. Assisted in the migration of the Kirtland Camp to Missouri in 1838. Following the expulsion of the Mormons from Missouri in 1839 he settled at Bear Creek, Adams County, Illinois. After the death of his wife in 1840, he married Margaret Lawrence, mother of Sarah and Maria Lawrence. Excommunicated in 1844; later rebaptized. Joined Reorganized Church, 1865. Died at Watsonville, Santa Cruz County, California. [PJSv2]

Butterfield, Josiah. Son of Abel and Mercy Butterfield. Born 13 March 1795 at Dunstable, Middlesex County, Massachusetts. Married Polly Moulton 30 October 1819. One known child: Josiah. Residing in Buxton, Maine, 1820-30. Baptized in Maine 1 October 1833 by John F. Boynton and Evan M. Greene. Moved to Kirtland, Ohio, about 1834. Worked on Kirtland Temple. Received blessing 7 March 1835 for working on Kirtland Temple. Ordained elder before 1836. Ordained seventy 1836. Charter member of and owned stock in Kirtland Safety Society January 1837. Ordained president of First Quorum of Seventy 6 April 1837. Owned property in Kirtland 1837-38. Member of Kirtland high council 1837; functioning simultaneously as seventy. Assisted in leading Kirtland Camp to Missouri 1838. Expelled from Missouri 1839. Located at Bear Creek, Adams County, Illinois, 1839. Wife, Polly, died 28 October 1840 at Bear Creek. Married Margaret Lawrence (mother of Sarah and Maria Lawrence). Margaret born 29 April 1801 in Toronto, Canada. Argued with Joseph Smith over Lawrence estate. Appointed to preach in Maine April 1844. Excommunicated 7 October 1844. Later rebaptized. Received endowment 20 January 1846 in Nauvoo Temple. Remained in Midwest until about 1850. Moved to California by 1853. Married Clarinda. Two known children: Mary and Charles. Died 3 March 1871 at Watsonville, Santa Cruz County, California. [Cook]

Butterfield, Justin (1790-1855), lawyer; born at Keene, Cheshire County, New Hampshire. He practiced law in Jefferson County, New York, and New Orleans, Louisiana before moving to Chicago, Illinois in 1835. He was appointed U.S. District Attorney for Illinois in 1841, and Commissioner of the General Land Office in 1849. He held the position of Land Commissioner until disabled by paralysis in 1852. He died in Chicago. [PJSv2]

Byfield, Eliza, formerly Eliza Daugherty, became acquainted with McLellin and donated money to him in Oct. 1834 in Amherst, Ohio. [McLellin]