Health and Medicine among the Latter-day Saints: Science, Sense, and Scripture

This volume is one of a dozen in a series which “explores the ways in which major religions relate to the questions of human well-being” (ii). Some of the other volumes have treated health and medicine in the context of the Lutheran, Catholic, Christian Science, Hindu, and Islamic faiths.

In his helpful foreword, Martin E. Marty notes that these books aim to “inform the rest of us about neighbors, fellow citizens, people who care about care and who would cure and be cured while pursuing ways which set them apart” (x-xi). Aimed mainly at professional care givers, the books also give lay people a new view of their religious traditions by analyzing a crucial aspect of their belief and practice. Each volume is organized around ten themes, including death, suffering, healing, madness, sexuality, morality, and dignity (xiii), although Bush has packaged the themes in a unique way to present the Mormon case with greatest clarity and power.

Published in BYU Studies Quarterly 33:3
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