Article of the Week | BYU Studies

Article of the Week

By Simple Yet Propitious Means: The Art of Jorge Cocco Santangelo
May 28, 2018
Article of the Week
By Simple Yet Propitious Means: The Art of Jorge Cocco Santangelo
Author BYU Studies Staff,

This daily feature is the introduction to a full article by Herman du Toit that was published in issue 55:2. To read the full text of this article, follow the link below.

The Church History Museum in Salt Lake City has opened a new exhibit of paintings by Jorge Cocco Santangelo. BYU Studies Quarterly readers will remember Brother Cocco from his paintings published in issue 55, no. 2 (2016), in "By Simple Yet Propitious Means: The Art of Jorge Cocco Santangelo," by Herman du Toit.

The exhibit runs from May 17 to October 1, 2018. The full exhibit can be viewed online at history.lds.org. The website also offers a video about the artist and a short article discussing his style. The website introduces the exhibit:

In 21 paintings recently acquired by the Church History Museum, Argentine artist Jorge Cocco Santángelo captures the majesty of Jesus of Nazareth using straight lines, blocks of color, rounded forms, and angled and dramatic shafts of light.

Cocco calls his style sacrocubism because of his sacred subject matter and the clear influence of cubism, an early 20th–century art movement that abstracted objects to simple, geometric shapes. As a style, sacrocubism moves the viewer's attention away from superfluous details—textures of fabric, the accuracy of historical backgrounds, or the impossibility of capturing an exact likeness of Christ—by depicting simple shapes that allow the viewer to focus on the essential and most holy aspects of the sacred events themselves.