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Book Notice

Last Laborer Book
August 10, 2017
Book Notice
Last Laborer: Thoughts and Reflections of a Black Mormon
Keith N. Hamilton

This daily feature is an introduction to a full book notice by Keith N. Hamilton. To read the full text of this review, follow the link below.

Somewhere between memoir and testimonial lies a category of work where an accomplished person attempts to explore the particulars of their own experience in a way that is both useful and interesting to others. Keith N. Hamilton’s Last Laborer: Thoughts and Reflections of a Black Mormon explores his personal history in the context of being a black convert to The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints soon after the revelation on the priesthood was announced. The narrative neither accuses nor defends, choosing instead to simply explore how he has integrated his often difficult experience with a strong sense of identity and a hopeful faith in a clear, direct, and very readable personal voice.

The author coins the term “doctrimonial” to describe the work, underpinning its peculiar nature as a combination memoir, doctrinal explication, and personal interpretation—a model mirrored in the book’s three sections. The first section is a memoir that explores key experiences growing up in traditional African-American culture in and around the Jim Crow South. Those challenges prepared him to hear and accept the gospel as a student at North Carolina State University—and deal with the social and cultural backlash that he felt both as he finished his undergraduate degree at NC State and as he went on (after serving an LDS mission) to the somewhat alien environment of Brigham Young University, being the first black student accepted at the J. Reuben Clark Law School. Hamilton is clear and direct about the dissonance he often felt as he tried to reconcile a gospel of peace and unity with a culture that had not yet learned to comfortably accommodate an accomplished black Mormon, particularly one with a peculiar sense of humor.