Book Review | BYU Studies

Book Review

A House Full of Females: Plural Marriage and Women's Rights in Early Mormonism, 1835-1870
July 26, 2018
Book Review
A House Full of Females: Plural Marriage and Women's Rights in Early Mormonism, 1835-1870
Reviewer Lowell C. Bennion,

This daily feature is an introduction to a full book review by Lowell C. Bennion. To read the full text of this review, follow the link below.

Laurel Thatcher Ulrich, a distinguished history professor emerita from Harvard University, has recently released a long–awaited and widely acclaimed work on women and plural marriage in early Mormonism, titled A House Full of Females. She has previously published four books related to Colonial and Revolutionary America, one of which, A Midwife's Tale, won both a Bancroft and a Pulitzer Prize the year after its publication in 1990. She describes A House Full of Females, which she began a decade ago, as "my first attempt to approach early Mormonism as a work of scholarship" (389). Given her relatively late entry into Mormon Studies, readers of BYU Studies Quarterly may not be familiar with Ulrich's work, unless they have already read the three very favorable reviews of her new book published in BYU's 2018 issue of Mormon Studies Review and her response to them. Mine is another favorable review, which aims to highlight aspects of the book that BYU Studies readers will find most interesting and adds to the growing praise Ulrich is receiving for this masterful work.