Book Review | BYU Studies

Book Review

The Believing Scientist: Essays on Science and Religion
November 22, 2018
Book Review
The Believing Scientist: Essays on Science and Religion
Reviewer Hyrum Lewis,

This daily feature is an introduction to a full book review by Hyrum Lewis. To read the full text of this review, follow the link below.

Since the rise of the New Atheist movement two decades ago, a number of religious apologists have come forward to defend belief in God. Many of them have been journalists (e.g., Lee Strobel), clergymen (e.g., Timothy Keller), philosophers (e.g., David Bentley Hart), theologians (e.g., William Lane Craig), mathematicians (e.g., David Berlinski), and even historians (I suppose my own book There Is a God would qualify as a historian's contribution to the genre). But since atheists claim the mantle and authority of science when dismissing religion, perhaps the best defenders of belief are scientists themselves.

The great value of Stephen M. Barr's book The Believing Scientist is that Barr has all the key scientific credentials—PhD in physics from Princeton, professor at the University of Delaware, member of the American Physical Society, author of numerous peer-reviewed articles on cosmology—and is also a practicing Catholic. Unlike those in other fields, he has the authority and expertise to make a case for religion that engages science at the highest level.