History of the Church Series | BYU Studies

History of the Church Series

The Haun's Mill Massacre
July 12, 2017
History of the Church Series
The Haun's Mill Massacre
Alma R. Blair

This daily feature is an introduction to a full article by Alma R. Blair. Each Wednesday we focus on an aspect of church history, beginning in New York in the early 19th century and progressing throughout the year to Utah in the 20th century. To read the full text of this article, follow the link below.

Jacob Haun's mill was one of several scattered along Shoal Creek. For about a year it had been the home of fifteen to twenty families of the Saints, and other Church members in the area used it for grinding their grain. It had also become a stopping place for those migrating to Caldwell County from Kirtland. Although few Saints had settled in Livingstone County or Carroll County to the east, and although the mill was inside Caldwell County, it was close to the borders and threatened to become a center for the Mormon population that might spill over into gentile territory.

This article attempts to recount the events, known as the Haun's Mill Massacre, which took place here on that horrible October day in 1838, even though those events may be beyond our understanding.