Special Feature | BYU Studies

Special Feature

Happy Father's Day!
June 14, 2018
Special Feature
Happy Father's Day!
Author BYU Studies Staff,

Father's Day is a time for children to honor their fathers with handmade cards and small gifts, and it's also a moment to reflect on our relationship with our Heavenly Father. Here are an editor's picks of personal stories and articles on fatherhood.

"Gentle Father," George Bennion, BYU Studies 35, no. 4
In this personal narrative, a son learns important life lessons from his gentle father: hard work, restraint, fairness, respect, and even when to give gentle disrespect to a ruthless person.

"O Lord, My God," Sheldon Lawrence, BYU Studies 46, no. 3
Joseph Smith's last words inspire a young father to reflect on life and death. While comforting his own toddler son, the father reflects on another boy's death, and finds that these words are an outstretched hand that keep him from drowning in sadness and fear.

"The Paternity Test," Eric d’'Evegnee, BYU Studies 49, no. 3
A father tells of the angst he experienced when his son expected his help in crafting a wooden car for the Cub Scout pinewood derby, his prowess as a father on the line.

"Testimony in Art: John Hafen's Illustrations for 'O My Father,'" Dawn Pheysey, BYU Studies 36, no. 1
Mormon artist John Hafen created eight illustrations to accompany the poem "O My Father" and published them in a booklet. This article publishes the illustrations with commentary and discusses Hafen's financial struggles. The doctrine in the "O My Father" hymn was at the core of Hafen's religious conviction. He saw the celestial family relationship as a progressive continuation of his earthly family associations.

Available for purchase:

Father of a Prophet, Andrew Kimball, by Edward L. Kimball, $9.99, softcover book, 268 pages

Andrew Kimball, son of Heber C. Kimball and father of Spencer W. Kimball, presided for twelve years over the Indian Territory Mission, and he worked for years as a salesman in Utah and Idaho traveling from village to village. Then, in 1898, Church leaders called Andrew to move with his family to Arizona and preside over the St. Joseph Stake, covering southeastern Arizona and extending to El Paso, Texas, including Mormon settlements in the Gila River Valley. Andrew invested himself deeply in his adopted community. He served a term in the Arizona legislature and exerted statewide influence as chair of the agricultural and horticultural commission. His twenty–five years in stake administration illuminate the Church's maturation from pioneer times to a period of international growth, and his exemplary loyalty and personal high principles were passed on to his son Spencer, especially as father and son served together in the stake presidency.