Special Feature | BYU Studies

Special Feature

Culture Carol: Dicken's Influence on LDS Christmas Fiction
December 27, 2018
Special Feature
Culture Carol: Dicken's Influence on LDS Christmas Fiction
Author

“Culture Carol: Dickens's Influence on LDS Christmas Fiction,” by Rosalynde F. Welch
During the festive weeks before Christmas feasts, everybody loves to hate Scrooge. That's how it always was in the household of my childhood. On the first Sunday afternoon of December, my father would gather the children in the family room and ceremonially produce our green, hardbound edition of A Christmas Carol. He worked his way through the five staves of the Carol during that afternoon and the Sunday afternoons that followed, in order to complete the reading before Christmas Day. Although the younger children would fidget and the older children would complain, we needed the annual retelling of the tale to demarcate the ritualized realm of "the holidays" and signal our entry into sacralized Christmastime. All rituals require narrative; A Christmas Carol supplied the narrative structure (fig. 1)—the good guys and bad guys, the beginning, middle, and end—of our suburban, middle-class Christmas ritual.

Behold the Condescension of God: A Scriptural Perspective on Three Nativity Scenes, by Richard G. Oman and Doris R. Dant
In the midst of the Christmas season's commercialization, frenzied preparations, and parties, families worldwide set aside time to arrange a nativity scene on a mantelpiece or table. More than any other traditional Christmas object, these nativity sets bid us heed the message of Christ's birth. What the nativities specifically say differs with the endless variations played out by their creators and those who arrange the scenes, but certain scriptural themes are common. To show how some of these themes are presented by nativity scenes, this article will analyze three world-class nativities created by Latter-day Saints Gerg Sjokvist, Harrison Begay Jr., and Lapita K. Frewin.