Volume 4 Chapter 15 | BYU Studies

Volume 4 Chapter 15

 

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Chapter 15

Reconstruction of Church Affairs at Nauvoo—Revelation—Municipal Organization of Nauvoo—Installation of Civic and Military Officers.

Friday, January 15, 1841.—I published the following in the Times and Seasons

Reproof of John E. Page and Orson Hyde.

Elders Orson Hyde and John E. Page are informed that the Lord is not well pleased with them, in consequence of delaying their mission, (John E. Page in particular) and they are requested, by the First Presidency, to hasten their journey towards their destination.

Sunday, 17.—Elder Brigham Young preached twice in the Music Hall, Liverpool.

Monday, 18.—Elders Brigham Young and Willard Richards commenced reading the Book of Mormon, and writing an index to the English edition.

Tuesday, 19.—Elder Amos Fielding has baptized twenty-nine at Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England.

I received the following revelation: 1

Revelation Given to Joseph Smith at Nauvoo, January 19th, 1841.

Verily, thus saith the Lord unto you, my servant Joseph Smith, I am well pleased with your offering and acknowledgments, which you have made, for unto this end have I raised you up, that I might show forth my wisdom through the weak things of the earth.

Your prayers are acceptable before me, and in answer to them I say unto you, that you are now called immediately to make a solemn proclamation of my Gospel, and of this Stake which I have planted to be a corner-stone of Zion, which shall be polished with the refinement which is after the similitude of a palace.

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This proclamation shall be made to all the kings of the world, to the four corners thereof; to the honorable President elect, and the high-minded Governors of the nation in which you live, and to all the nations of the earth, scattered abroad.

Let it be written in the spirit of meekness and by the power of the Holy Ghost, which shall be in you at the time of the writing of the same;

For it shall be given you by the Holy Ghost to know my will concerning those kings and authorities, even what shall befall them in a time to come.

For, behold! I am about to call upon them to give heed to the light and glory of Zion, for the set time has come to favor her.

Call ye, therefore, upon them with loud proclamation, and with your testimony, fearing them not, for they are as grass, and all their glory as the flower thereof which soon falleth, that they may be left also without excuse,

And that I may visit them in the day of visitation, when I shall unveil the face of my covering, to appoint the portion of the oppressor among hypocrites, where there is gnashing of teeth, if they reject my servants and my testimony which I have revealed unto them.

And again, I will visit and soften their hearts, many of them for your good, that ye may find grace in their eyes, that they may come to the light of truth, and the Gentiles to the exaltation or lifting up of Zion.

For the day of my visitation cometh speedily, in an hour when ye think not of, and where shall be the safety of my people, and refuge for those who shall be left of them?

Awake, O kings of the earth! Come ye, O, come ye, with your gold and your silver, to the help of my people, to the house of the daughters of Zion.

And again, verily I say unto you, let my servant Robert B. Thompson help you to write this proclamation, for I am well pleased with him, and that he should be with you;

Let him, therefore, hearken to your counsel, and I will bless him with a multiplicity of blessings; let him be faithful and true in all things from henceforth, and he shall be great in mine eyes;

But let him remember that his stewardship will I require at his hands.

And again, verily I say unto you, blessed is my servant Hyrum Smith, for I, the Lord, love him because of the integrity of his heart, and because he loveth that which is right before me, saith the Lord.

Again, let my servant John C. Bennett, help you in your labor in sending my word to the kings and people of the earth, and stand by you, even you my servant Joseph Smith, in the hour of affliction, and his reward shall not fail, if he receive counsel;

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And for his love he shall be great, for he shall be mine if he do this, saith the Lord. I have seen the work which he hath done, which I accept, if he continue, and will crown him with blessings and great glory.

And again, I say unto you, that it is my will that my servant Lyman Wight should continue in preaching for Zion, in the spirit of meekness confessing me before the world, and I will bear him up as on eagle's wings, and he shall beget glory and honor to himself, and unto my name.

That when he shall finish his work, that I may receive him unto myself, even as I did my servant David Patten, who is with me at this time, and also my servant Edward Partridge, and also my aged servant Joseph Smith, Sen., who sitteth with Abraham at his right hand, and blessed and holy is he, for he is mine.

And again, verily I say unto you, my servant George Miller is without guile: he may be trusted because of the integrity of his heart; and for the love which he has to my testimony I, the Lord, love him;

I therefore say unto you, I seal upon his head the office of a bishopric, like unto my servant Edward Partridge, that he may receive the consecrations of mine house, that he may administer blessing upon the heads of the poor of my people, saith the Lord. Let no man despise my servant George, for he shall honor me.

Let my servant George, and my servant Lyman, and my servant John Snider, and others, build a house unto my name, such an one as my servant Joseph shall show unto them; upon the place which he shall show unto them also.

And it shall be for a house for boarding, a house that strangers may come from afar to lodge therein; therefore let it be a good house, worthy of all acceptation, that the weary traveler may find health and safety while he shall contemplate the word of the Lord; and the cornerstone I have appointed for Zion.

This house shall be a healthy habitation if it be built unto my name, and if the governor which shall be appointed unto it shall not suffer any pollution to come upon it. It shall be holy, or the Lord your God will not dwell therein.

And again, verily I say unto you, let all my Saints come from afar;

And send ye swift messengers, yea, chosen messengers, and say unto them: Come ye, with all your gold, and your silver, and your precious stones, and with all your antiquities; and with all who have knowledge of antiquities, that will come, may come, and bring the box-tree, and the fir-tree, and the pine-tree, together with all the precious trees of the earth;

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And with iron, with copper, and with brass, and with zinc, and with all your precious things of the earth, and build a house to my name for the Most High to dwell therein;

For there is not a place found on earth that He may come and restore again that which was lost unto you, or which He hath taken away, even the fullness of the Priesthood;

For a baptismal font there is not upon the earth, that they, my Saints, may be baptized for those who are dead;

For this ordinance belongeth to my house, and cannot be acceptable to me, only in the days of your poverty, wherein ye are not able to build a house unto me.

But I command you, all ye my Saints, to build a house unto me; and I grant unto you a sufficient time to build a house unto me, and during this time your baptisms shall be acceptable unto me.

But behold, at the end of this appointment, your baptisms for your dead shall not be acceptable unto me; and if you do not these things at the end of the appointment, ye shall be rejected as a church, with your dead, saith the Lord your God.

For verily I say unto you, that after you have had sufficient time to build a house to me, wherein the ordinance of baptizing for the dead belongeth, and for which the same was instituted from before the foundation of the world, your baptisms for your dead cannot be acceptable unto me.

For therein are the keys of the holy Priesthood, ordained that you may receive honor and glory.

And after this time, your baptisms for the dead, by those who are scattered abroad, are not acceptable unto me, saith the Lord;

For it is ordained that in Zion, and in her stakes, and in Jerusalem, those places which I have appointed for refuge, shall be the places for your baptisms for your dead.

And again, verily I say unto you, how shall your washings be acceptable unto me, except ye perform them in a house which you have built to my name? For, for this cause I commanded Moses that he should build a tabernacle, that they should bear it with them in the wilderness, and to build a house in the land of promise, that those ordinances might be revealed which had been hid from before the world was;

Therefore, verily I say unto you, that your anointings, and your washings, and your baptisms for the dead, and your solemn assemblies, and your memorials for your sacrifices, by the sons of Levi, and for your oracles in your most holy places, wherein you receive conversations, and your statutes and judgments, for the beginning of the revelations and foundation of Zion, and for the glory, honor, and endowment of all her municipals, are ordained by the ordinance of my holy house which my people are always commanded to build unto my holy name.

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And verily I say unto you, let this house be built unto my name, that I may reveal mine ordinances therein, unto my people;

For I deign to reveal unto my Church things which have been kept hid from before the foundation of the world, things that pertain to the dispensation of the fullness of times;

And I will show unto my servant Joseph all things pertaining to this house, and the Priesthood thereof; and the place whereon it shall be built;

And ye shall build it on the place where you have contemplated building it, for that is the spot which I have chosen for you to build it;

If ye labor with all your might, I will consecrate that spot that it shall be made holy;

And if my people will hearken unto my voice, and unto the voice of my servants whom I have appointed to lead my people, behold, verily I say unto you, they shall not be moved out of their place.

But if they will not hearken to my voice, nor unto the voice of these men whom I have appointed, they shall not be blest, because they pollute mine holy grounds, and mine holy ordinances, and charters, and my holy words which I give unto them.

And it shall come to pass, that if you build a house unto my name, and do not do the things that I say, I will not perform the oath which I make unto you, neither fulfill the promises which ye expect at my hands, saith the Lord;

For instead of blessings, ye, by your own works, bring cursings, wrath, indignation, and judgments upon your own heads, by your follies, and by all your abominations, which you practice before me, saith the Lord.

Verily, verily I say unto you, that when I give a commandment to any of the sons of men, to do a work unto my name, and those sons of men go with all their might, and with all they have, to perform that work, and cease not their diligence, and their enemies come upon them, and hinder them from performing that work; behold, it behooveth me to require that work no more at the hands of those sons of men, but to accept of their offerings;

And the iniquity and transgression of my holy laws and commandments, I will visit upon the heads of those who hindered my work, unto the third and fourth generation, so long as they repent not, and hate me, saith the Lord God.

Therefore for this cause have I accepted the offerings of those whom I commanded to build up a city and a house unto my name, in Jackson county, Missouri, and were hindered by their enemies, saith the Lord your God.

And I will answer judgment, wrath, and indignation, wailing, and gnashing of teeth upon their heads, unto the third and fourth generation, so long as they repent not and hate me, saith the Lord your God.

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And this I make an example unto you, for your consolation concerning all those who have been commanded to do a work, and have been hindered by the hands of their enemies, and by oppression, saith the Lord your God;

For I am the Lord your God, and will save all those of your brethren who have been pure in heart, and have been slain in the land of Missouri, saith the Lord.

And again, verily I say unto you, I command you again to build a house to my name, even in this place that you may prove yourselves unto me that ye are faithful in all things whatsoever I command you, that I may bless you, and crown you with honor, immortality, and eternal life.

And now I say unto you, as pertaining to my boarding house which I have commanded you to build for the boarding of strangers, let it be built unto my name, and let my name be named upon it, and let my servant Joseph, and his house have place therein, from generation to generation;

For this anointing have I put upon his head, that his blessing shall also be put upon the head of his posterity after him,

And as I said unto Abraham concerning the kindreds of the earth, even so I say unto my servant Joseph, in thee and in thy seed, shall the kindred of the earth be blessed.

Therefore, let my servant Joseph and his seed after him have place in that house, from generation to generation, for ever and ever, saith the Lord.

And let the name of that house be called Nauvoo House, and let it be a delightful habitation for man, and a resting place for the weary traveler, that he may contemplate the glory of Zion, and the glory of this, the corner-stone thereof;

That he may receive also the counsel from those whom I have set to be as plants of renown, and as watchmen upon her walls.

Behold, verily I say unto you, let my servant George Miller, and my servant Lyman Wight, and my servant John Snider, and my servant Peter Haws, organize themselves, and appoint one of them to be a president over their quorum for the purpose of building that house.

And they shall form a constitution whereby they may receive stock for the building of that house.

And they shall not receive less than fifty dollars for a share of stock in that house, and they shall be permitted to receive fifteen thousand dollars from any one man for stock in that house;

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But they shall not be permitted to receive over fifteen thousand dollars stock from any one man;

And they shall not be permitted to receive under fifty dollars for a share of stock from any one man in that house;

And they shall not be permitted to receive any man as a stockholder in this house, except the same shall pay his stock into their hands at the time he receives stock;

And in proportion to the amount of stock he pays into their hands, he shall receive stock in that house; but if he pays nothing into their hands, he shall not receive any stock in that house.

And if any pay stock into their hands, it shall be for stock in that house, for himself, and for his generation after him, from generation to generation, so long as he and his heirs shall hold that stock, and do not sell or convey the stock away out of their hands by their own free will and act, if you will do my will, saith the Lord your God.

And again, verily I say unto you, if my servant George Miller, and my servant Lyman Wight, and my servant John Snider, and my servant Peter Haws, receive any stock into their hands, in moneys or in properties, wherein they receive the real value of moneys, they shall not appropriate any portion of that stock to any other purpose, only in that house;

And if they do appropriate any portion of that stock anywhere else, only in that house, without the consent of the stockholder, and do not repay fourfold for the stock which they appropriate anywhere else, only in that house, they shall be accursed, and shall be moved out of their place, saith the Lord God, for I, the Lord, am God, and cannot be mocked in any of these things.

Verily I say unto you, let my servant Joseph pay stock into their hands for the building of that house, as seemeth him good; but my servant Joseph cannot pay over fifteen thousand dollars stock in that house, nor under fifty dollars; neither can any other man, saith the Lord.

And there are others also who wish to know my will concerning them, for they have asked it at my hands.

Therefore I say unto you concerning my servant Vinson Knight, if he will do my will, let him put stock into that house for himself, and for his generation after him, from generation to generation,

And let him lift up his voice long and loud, in the midst of the people, to plead the cause of the poor and the needy, and let him not fail, neither let his heart faint, and I will accept of his offerings, for they shall not be unto me as the offerings of Cain, for he shall be mine, saith the Lord.

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Let his family rejoice, and turn away their hearts from affliction, for I have chosen him and anointed him, and he shall be honored in the midst of his house, for I will forgive all his sins, saith the Lord. Amen.

Verily I say unto you, let my servant Hyrum put stock into that house as seemeth him good, for himself and his generation after him, from generation to generation.

Let my servant Isaac Galland put stock into that house, for I, the Lord, love him for the work he hath done, and will forgive all his sins; therefore, let him be remembered for an interest in that house from generation to generation.

Let my servant Isaac Galland be appointed among you, and be ordained by my servant William Marks, and be blessed of him, to go with my servant Hyrum, to accomplish the work that my servant Joseph shall point out to them, and they shall be greatly blessed.

Let my servant William Marks pay stock into that house, as seemeth him good, for himself and his generation, from generation to generation.

Let my servant Henry G. Sherwood pay stock into that house, as seemeth him good, for himself and his seed after him from generation to generation.

Let my servant William Law pay stock into that house, for himself and his seed after him, from generation to generation.

If he will do my will, let him not take his family unto the eastern lands, even unto Kirtland; nevertheless, I, the Lord, will build up Kirtland, but I, the Lord, have a scourge prepared for the inhabitants thereof.

And with my servant Almon Babbitt, there are many things with which I am not pleased; behold, he aspireth to establish his council instead of the council which I have ordained, even the Presidency of my Church, and he setteth up a golden calf for the worship of my people.

Let no man go from this place who has come here essaying to keep my commandments.

If they live here let them live unto me; and if they die, let them die unto me; for they shall rest from all their labors here, and shall continue their works.

Therefore let my servant William put his trust in me, and cease to fear concerning his family, because of the sickness of the land. If ye love me, keep my commandments, and the sickness of the land shall redound to your glory.

Let my servant William go and proclaim my everlasting Gospel with a loud voice, and with great joy, as he shall be moved upon by my Spirit, unto the inhabitants of Warsaw, and also unto the inhabitants of Carthage, and also unto the inhabitants of Burlington, and also unto the inhabitants of Madison, and await patiently and diligently for further instructions at my general conference, saith the Lord.

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If he will do my will, let him from henceforth hearken to the counsel of my servant Joseph, and with his interest support the cause of the poor, and publish the new translation of my holy word unto the inhabitants of the earth;

And if he will do this, I will bless him with a multiplicity of blessings, that he shall not be forsaken, nor his seed be found begging bread.

And again, verily I say unto you, let my servant William be appointed, ordained, and anointed as a counselor unto my servant Joseph, in the room of my servant Hyrum; that my servant Hyrum may take the office of Priesthood and Patriarch which was appointed unto him by his father, by blessing and also by right.

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That from henceforth he shall hold the keys of the Patriarchal blessings upon the heads of all my people,

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That whomsoever he blesses shall be blessed, and whomsoever he curses shall be cursed; that whatsoever he shall bind on earth shall be bound in heaven; and whatsoever he shall loose on earth shall be loosed in heaven;

And from this time forth I appoint unto him that he may be a prophet, and a seer and a revelator unto my Church, as well as my servant Joseph.

That he may act in concert also with my servant Joseph, and that he shall receive counsel from my servant Joseph, who shall show unto him the keys whereby he may ask and receive, and be crowned with the same blessing, and glory, and honor, and Priesthood, and gifts of the Priesthood, that once were put upon him that was my servant Oliver Cowdery;

That my servant Hyrum may bear record of the things which I shall show unto him, that his name may be had in honorable remembrance from generation to generation forever and ever.

Let my servant William Law also receive the keys by which he may ask and receive blessings; let him be humble before me, and be without guile, and he shall receive of my Spirit, even the Comforter, which shall manifest unto him the truth of all things, and shall give him in the very hour what he shall say.

And these signs shall follow him; he shall heal the sick, he shall cast out devils, and shall be delivered from those who would administer unto him deadly poison;

And he shall be led in paths where the poisonous serpent cannot lay hold upon his heel, and he shall mount up in the imagination of his thoughts as upon eagle's wings;

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And what if I will that he should raise the dead, let him not withhold his voice.

Therefore, let my servant William cry aloud and spare not, with joy and rejoicing, and with hosannas to Him that sitteth upon the throne forever and ever, saith the Lord your God.

Behold I say unto you, I have a mission in store for my servant William and my servant Hyrum, and for them alone; and let my servant Joseph tarry at home, for he is needed; the remainder I will show unto you hereafter. Even so. Amen.

And again, verily I say unto you, if my servant Sidney will serve me and be counselor unto my servant Joseph, let him arise and come up and stand in the office of his calling, and humble himself before me;

And if he will offer unto me an acceptable offering, and acknowledgments, and remain with my people, behold, I, the Lord your God, will heal him that he shall be healed; and he shall lift up his voice again on the mountains, and be a spokesman before my face.

Let him come and locate his family in the neighborhood in which my servant Joseph resides,

And in all his journeyings let him lift up his voice as with the sound of a trump, and warn the inhabitants of the earth to flee the wrath to come;

Let him assist my servant Joseph; and also let my servant William Law assist my servant Joseph, in making a solemn proclamation unto the kings of the earth, even as I have before said unto you;

If my servant Sidney will do my will, let him not remove his family unto the eastern lands, but let him change their habitation even as I have said.

Behold, it is not my will that he shall seek to find safety and refuge out of the city which I have appointed unto you, even the city of Nauvoo.

Verily I say unto you, even now, if he will hearken unto my voice, it shall be well with him. Even so. Amen.

And again, verily I say unto you, let my servant Amos Davis pay stock into the hands of those whom I have appointed to build a house for boarding, even the Nauvoo House;

This let him do if he will have an interest, and let him hearken unto the counsel of my servant Joseph, and labor with his own hands that he may obtain the confidence of men;

And when he shall prove himself faithful in all things that shall be entrusted unto his care, yea, even a few things, he shall be made ruler over many;

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Let him therefore abase himself that he may be exalted. Even so. Amen.

And again, verily I say unto you, if my servant Robert D. Foster will obey my voice, let him build a house for my servant Joseph, according to the contract which he has made with him, as the door shall be open to him from time to time.

And let him repent of all his folly, and clothe himself with charity, and cease to do evil, and lay aside all his hard speeches,

And pay stock also into the hands of the quorum of the Nauvoo House for himself and for his generation after him, from generation to generation,

And hearken unto the counsel of my servants Joseph and Hyrum and William Law, and unto the authorities which I have called to lay the foundation of Zion, and it shall be well with him for ever and ever, Even so. Amen.

And again, verily I say unto you, let no man pay stock to the quorum of the Nauvoo House, unless he shall be a believer in the Book of Mormon, and the revelations I have given unto you, saith the Lord your God;

For that which is more or less than this cometh of evil, and shall be attended with cursings and not blessings, saith the Lord your God. Even so. Amen.

And again, verily I say unto you, let the quorum of the Nauvoo House have a just recompense of wages for all their labors which they do in building the Nauvoo House, and let their wages be as shall be agreed among themselves, as pertaining to the price thereof;

And let every man who pays stock bear his proportion of their wages, if it must needs be, for their support, saith the Lord; otherwise, their labors shall be accounted unto them for stock in that house. Even so. Amen.

Verily I say unto you, I now give unto you the officers belonging to my Priesthood, that ye may hold the keys thereof, even the Priesthood which is after the order of Melchisedek, which is after the order of my Only Begotten Son.

First, I give unto you Hyrum Smith, to be a Patriarch unto you, to hold the sealing blessings of my church, even the Holy Spirit of promise, whereby ye are sealed up unto the day of redemption, that ye may not fall, notwithstanding the hour of temptation that may come upon you.

I give unto you my servant Joseph, to be a presiding elder over all my church, to be a translator, a revelator, a seer, and prophet.

I give unto him for counselors my servant Sidney Rigdon, and my servant William Law, that these may constitute a quorum and First Presidency, to receive the oracles for the whole church.

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I give unto you my servant Brigham Young, to be a President over Twelve traveling Council;

Which Twelve hold the keys to open up the authority of my kingdom upon the four corners of the earth, and after that to send my word to every creature.

They are Heber C. Kimball, Parley P. Pratt, Orson Pratt, Orson Hyde, William Smith, John Taylor, John E. Page, Wilford Woodruff, Willard Richards, George A. Smith;

David Patten I have taken unto myself; behold, his Priesthood no man taketh from him; but verily I say unto you, another may be appointed unto the same calling.

And again, I say unto you, I give unto you a High Council, for the corner stone of Zion;

Viz., Samuel Bent, Henry G. Sherwood, George W. Harris, Charles C. Rich, Thomas Grover, Newel Knight, David Dort, Dunbar Wilson; (Seymour Brunson I have taken unto myself, no man taketh his Priesthood, but another may be appointed unto the same Priesthood in his stead; and verily I say unto you, let my servant Aaron Johnson be ordained unto this calling in his stead); David Fullmer, Alpheus Cutler, William Huntington.

And again, I give unto you Don C. Smith, to be a president over a quorum of High Priests;

Which ordinance is instituted for the purpose of qualifying those who shall be appointed standing presidents or servants over different Stakes scattered abroad,

And they may travel also if they choose, but rather be ordained for standing presidents, this is the office of their calling, saith the Lord your God.

I give unto him Amasa Lyman, and Noah Packard, for Counselors, that they may preside over the quorum of High Priests of my Church, saith the Lord.

And again, I say unto you, I give unto you John A. Hicks, Samuel Williams, and Jesse Baker, which Priesthood is to preside over the quorum of elders, which quorum is instituted for standing ministers, nevertheless they may travel, yet they are ordained to be standing ministers to my Church, saith the Lord.

And again, I give unto you, Joseph Young, Josiah Butterfield, Daniel Miles, Henry Harriman, Zera Pulsipher, Levi Hancock, James Foster, to preside over the quorum of seventies,

Which quorum is instituted for traveling elders to bear record of my name in all the world, wherever the traveling High Council, my apostles, shall send them to prepare a way before my face.

The difference between this quorum and the quorum of elders, is that one is to travel continually, and the other is to preside over the churches from time to time; the one has the responsibility of presiding from time to time, and the other has no responsibility of presiding, saith the Lord your God.

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And again, I say unto you, I give unto you Vinson Knight, Samuel R. Smith and Shadrach Roundy, if he will receive it, to preside over the bishopric; a knowledge of said bishopric is given unto you in the book of Doctrine and Covenants.

And again, I say unto you, Samuel Rolfe and his counselors for priests, and the president of the teachers and his counselors, and also the president of the deacons and his counselors, and also the president of the stake and his counselors;

The above offices I have given unto you, and the keys thereof, for helps and for governments, for the work of the ministry, and the perfecting of my Saints;

And a commandment I give unto you that you should fill all these offices and approve of those names which I have mentioned, or else disapprove of them at my general conference;

And that ye should prepare rooms for all these offices in my house when you build it unto my name, saith the Lord your God. Even so. Amen.

Thursday, 21.—Elders Brigham Young and Willard Richards completed the index to the Book of Mormon, and it was immediately put in type, which closed the printing of the first English edition.

Sunday, 24.—Elder Brigham Young preached twice at Liverpool on election and reprobation.

Hyrum Smith Installed as Patriarch.

Hyrum Smith, who received the office of Patriarch in the Church, in place of Joseph Smith, Sen., deceased, has by revelation been appointed a Prophet and Revelator. William Law has by revelation been appointed one of the First Presidency, in place of Hyrum Smith, appointed Patriarch. George Miller has been appointed, by revelation, Bishop in place of Edward Partridge, deceased.

Saturday, 30.—At a special conference of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, held at Nauvoo pursuant to public notice, I was unanimously elected sole Trustee-in-Trust for the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.

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Also Saturday the 30th and Sunday 31st, a Conference was held at Walnut Grove, Knox county, Illinois; Elder William Smith presiding; 113 members, 14 Elders were present; several branches were represented, and several persons baptized.

First Election of Municipal Officers in Nauvoo.

Monday, 1.—The first election in Nauvoo, for members of the City Council took place, and the following persons were elected by majorities varying from 330 to 337 votes; to wit, for Mayor, John C. Bennett; Aldermen, William Marks, Samuel H. Smith, Daniel H. Wells, Newel K. Whitney; Councilors, Joseph Smith Hyrum Smith, Sidney Rigdon, Charles C. Rich, John T. Barnett, Wilson Law, Don Carlos Smith, John P. Greene, Vinson Knight.

City Of Nauvoo, Hancock County, Illinois, Feb. 1, A. D. 1841.

To the County Recorder of the County of Hancock:

Dear Sir:—At a meeting of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, at this place on Saturday, the 30th day of January, A. D. 1841, I was elected sole Trustee for said Church, to hold my office during life (my successors to be the First Presidency of said Church) and vested with plenary powers, as sole Trustee in Trust for the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, to receive, acquire, manage or convey property, real, personal, or mixed, for the sole use and benefit of said Church, agreeably to the provisions of an act entitled, "An Act Concerning Religious Societies," approved February 6, 1835.

Joseph Smith, (L. S.)

State Of Illinois Hancock Co., ss.

This day personally appeared before me, Daniel H. Wells, a justice of the peace, within and for the county of Hancock, County aforesaid, Isaac Galland, Robert B. Thompson, and John C. Bennett, who being duly sworn, depose and say that the foregoing certificate of Joseph Smith is true.

Isaac Galland,

Robert B. Thompson

John C. Bennett.

Sworn to and subscribed this third day of February in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and forty-one before me,

Daniel H. Wells,

Justice of the Peace.

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The above is recorded in the county records at Carthage, in book No. 1, of Bonds and Mortgages, page 95, No. 87.

Wednesday 3.—Elder Taylor reports 160 baptized in Liverpool, England; in Ireland about 25; in the Isle of Man, 70; Hawarden, 30. Elder Lorenzo Snow is laboring in London.

Nauvoo City Council Organized.

The City Council of Nauvoo was organized; the opening prayer was offered by myself, after which the Mayor-elect delivered his inaugural address as published in the Times and Seasons, page 316, as follows:

Inaugural Address.

City Of Nauvoo, Illinois, Feb. 3rd, 1841.

Gentlemen of the City Council, Aldermen and Councillors:

Having been elected to the Mayoralty of this city by the unanimous suffrage of all parties and interests, I now enter upon the duties devolving upon me as your Chief Magistrate under a deep sense of the responsibilities of the station. I trust that the confidence reposed in me, by my fellow citizens, has not been misplaced, and for the honor conferred they will accept my warmest sentiments of gratitude. By the munificence and wise legislation of noble, high-minded, and patriotic statesmen, and the grace of God, we have been blessed with one of the most liberal corporate acts ever granted by a legislative assembly. As the presiding officer of the law-making department of the municipal government, it will be expected that I communicate to you, from time to time, by oral or written messages, for your deliberative consideration and action, such matters as may suggest themselves to me in relation to the public weal; and upon this occasion I beg leave to present the following as matters of paramount importance:

The 21st section of the addenda to the 13th section of the City Charter, concedes to you plenary power "to tax, restrain, prohibit and suppress, tippling houses, dram shops," etc., etc., and I now recommend, in the strongest possible terms, that you take prompt, strong, and decisive measures to "prohibit and suppress" all such establishments. It is true you have the power "to tax," or license and tolerate, them, and thus add to the city finances; but I consider it much better to raise revenue by an advalorem tax on the property of sober men, than by licensing dram shops, or taxing the signs of the inebriated worshipers at the shrine of Bacchus. The revels of bacchanalians in the houses of blasphemy and noise will always prove a disgrace to a moral people. Public sentiment will do much to suppress the vice of intemperance, and its concomitant evil results; but ample experience has incontrovertibly proven that it cannot do all—the law must be brought to the rescue, and an effective prohibitory ordinance enacted. This cannot be done at a better time than at the present. Let us commence correctly, and the great work of reform, at least so far as our peaceful city is concerned, can be summarily consummated. It would be difficult to calculate the vast amount of evil and crime that would be prevented, and the great good that would accrue to the public at large by fostering the cause of temperance; but suffice it to say that the one would be commensurate to the other. No sales of spirituous liquors whatever, in a less quantity than a quart, except in cases of sickness on the recommendation of a physician or surgeon duly accredited by the Chancellor and Regents of the University, should be tolerated. The liberty of selling the intoxicating cup is a false liberty—it enslaves, degrades, destroys; and wretchedness and want are attendant on every step,—its touch, like that of the poison upas, is death. Liberty to do good should be cheerfully and freely accorded to every man; but liberty to do evil, which is licentiousness, should be peremptorily prohibited. The public good imperiously demands it—and the cause of humanity pleads for help. The protecting aegis of the corporation should be thrown around every moral and religious institution of the day, which is in any way calculated to ennoble, or ameliorate the condition of the human family.

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The immediate organization of the University, as contemplated in the 24th section of the act incorporating our city, cannot be too forcibly impressed upon you at this time. As all matters in relation to mental culture, and public instruction, from common schools up to the highest branches of a full collegiate course in the arts, sciences, and learned professions, will devolve upon the Chancellor and Regents of the University, they should be speedily elected, and instructed to perfect their plan, and enter upon its execution with as little delay as possible. The wheels of education should never be clogged, or retrograde, but roll progressively from the Alpha to the Omega of a most perfect, liberal, and thorough course of university attainments. The following observations in relation to false education, from Alexander's Messenger, so perfectly accords with my feelings and views on this highly important subject, that I cannot do better than incorporate them in this message.

"Among the changes for the worse, which the world has witnessed within the last century, we include that specious, superficial, incomplete way of doing certain things, which were formerly thought to be deserving of care, labor and attention. It would seem that appearance is now considered of more moment than reality. The modern mode of education is an example in point. Children are so instructed as to acquire a smattering of everything, and as a matter of consequence, they know nothing properly. Seminaries and academies deal out their moral and natural philosophy, their geometry, trigonometry, and astronomy, their chemistry, botany, and mineralogy, until the mind of the pupil becomes a chaos; and, like the stomach when it is overloaded with a variety of food, it digests nothing, but converts the superabundant nutriment to poison. This mode of education answers one purpose—it enables people to seem learned; and seemingly, by a great many, is thought all sufficient. Thus we are schooled in quackery, and are early taught to regard showy and superficial attainments as most desirable. Every boarding school Miss is a Plato in petticoats, without an ounce of that genuine knowledge, that true philosophy, which would enable her to be useful in the world, and to escape those perils with which she must necessarily be encompassed. Young people are taught to use a variety of hard terms, which they understand but imperfectly—to repeat lessons which they are unable to apply—to astonish their grandmothers with a display of their parrot-like acquisitions; but their mental energies are clogged and torpified with a variety of learned lumber, most of which is discarded from the brain long before its possessor knows how to use it. This is the quackery of education.

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"The effects of the erring system are not easily obliterated. The habit of using words without thought, sticks to the unfortunate student through life, and should he ever learn to think, he cannot express his ideas without the most tedious and perplexing verbosity. This is, more or less, the fault of every writer in the nineteenth century. The sense is encumbered with sound. The scribbler appears to imagine that if he puts a sufficient number of words together he has done his part; and, alas! how many books are written on this principle. Thus literature, and even science itself, is overloaded with froth and flummery. Verbalizing has become fashionable and indispensable, and one line from an ancient author will furnish the materials for a modern treatise."

Our University should be a "utilitarian" institution—and competent, industrious teachers and professors should be immediately elected for the several departments. "Knowledge is power,"—foster education and we are forever free! Nothing can be done which is more certainly calculated to perpetuate the free institutions of our common country, for which our progenitors "fought and bled, and died," than the general diffusion of useful knowledge amongst the people. Education should always be of a purely practical character, for such, and such alone, is calculated to perfect the happiness and prosperity of our fellow-citizens—ignorance, impudence, and false knowledge, are equally detestible,—shame and confusion follow in their train. As you now possess the power, afford the most ample facilities to the Regents to make their plans complete; and thus enable them to set a glorious example to the world at large. The most liberal policy should attend the organization of the University, and equal honors and privileges should be extended to all classes of the community.

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In order to carry out the provisions of the 25th section of the act incorporating our city, I would recommend the immediate organization of the Legion. Comprising, as it does, the entire military power of our city, with a provision allowing any citizen of Hancock county to unite by voluntary enrollment, early facilities should be afforded the court martial for perfecting their plans of drill, rules, and regulations. Nothing is more necessary to the preservation of order and the supremacy of the laws, than the perfect organization of our military forces, under a uniform and rigid discipline and approved judicious drill; and to this end I desire to see all the departments and cohorts of the Legion put in immediate requisition. The Legion should be all powerful, panoplied with justice and equity, to consummate the designs of its projectors—at all times ready, as minute men, to serve the state in such way and manner as may, from time to time, be pointed out by the Governor. You have long sought an opportunity of showing your attachment to the state government of Illinois—it is now afforded; the Legion should maintain the constitution and the laws, and be ready at all times for the public defense. The winged warrior of the air perches upon the pole of American liberty, and the beast that has the temerity to ruffle her feathers should be made to feel the power of her talons; and until she ceases to be our proud national emblem we should not cease to show our attachment to Illinois. Should the tocsin of alarm ever be sounded, and the Legion called to the tented field by our Executive, I hope to see it able, under one of the proudest mottoes that ever blazed upon a warrior's shield—Sicut patribus sit Deus nobis;"as God was with our fathers, so may He be with us"—to fight the battles of our country, as victors, and as freemen; the juice of the uva, or the spirit of insubordination should never enter our camp,—but we should stand, ever stand, as a united people—one and indivisible.

I would earnestly recommend the construction of a wing-dam in the Mississippi, at the mouth of the ravine at or near the head of Main street, and the excavation of a ship canal from that point to a point terminating in a grand reservoir on the bank of said river, east of the foot of said street, a distance of about two miles. This would afford, at the various outlets, the most ample water power for propelling any amount of machinery for mill and manufacturing purposes, so essentially necessary to the building up of a great commercial city in the heart of one of the most productive and delightful countries on earth. I would advise that an agent be immediately appointed on behalf of the city corporation, to negotiate with eastern capitalists for the completion of this great work, on the most advantageous terms, even to the conveyance of the privilege for a term of years. This work finished, and the future greatness of this city is placed upon an imperishable basis. In addition to the great advantages that will otherwise accrue to the city and country by the construction of this noble work, it would afford the best harbor for steamboats, for winter quarters, on this magnificent stream.

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The public health requires that the low lands, bordering on the Mississippi, should be immediately drained, and the entire timber removed. This can and will be one of the most healthful cities in the west, provided you take prompt and decisive action in the premises. A board of health should be appointed and vested with the usual powers and prerogatives.

The Governor, council of revision, and legislature of Illinois, should be held in everlasting remembrance by our people—they burst the chains of slavery and proclaimed us forever free! A vote of thanks, couched in the strongest language possible, should be tendered them in our corporate capacity; and, when this is done, Quincy, our first noble city of refuge, when we came from the slaughter in Missouri with our garments stained with blood, should not be forgotten.

As the Chief Magistrate of your city I am determined to execute all state laws and city ordinances passed in pursuance to law, to the very letter, should it require the strong arm of military power to enable me to do so. As an officer I know no man; the peaceful, unoffending in the full exercise of all his civil, political, and religious rights, and the guilty violator of law shall be punished, without respect to persons.

All of which is respectfully submitted. 2

John C. Bennett.

The following persons were elected by the council to their offices, to-wit—Henry G. Sherwood, marshal; James Sloan, recorder; Robert B. Thompson, treasurer; James Robinson, assessor; Austin Cowles, supervisor of streets. I presented to the city council the following resolution, which was unanimously adopted:

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Resolved by the City Council of the City of Nauvoo, that the unfeigned thanks of this community be respectfully tendered to the Governor, Council of Revision, and Legislature of the state of Illinois, as a feeble testimonial of their respect and esteem for noble, high-minded, and patriotic statesmen; and as an evidence of gratitude for the signal powers recently conferred; also that the citizens of Quincy be held in everlasting remembrance, for their unparalleled liberality and marked kindness to our people, when in their greatest state of suffering and want.

I presented a bill for an ordinance concerning the University of Nauvoo, which passed as follows:

Sec.1. Be it ordained by the City Council of the City of Nauvoo, that the "University of the City of Nauvoo," be, and the same is hereby organized by the appointment of the following Board of Trustees, to-wit—John C. Bennett, chancellor; William Law, registrar; and Joseph Smith, Sidney Rigdon, Hyrum Smith, William Marks, Samuel H. Smith, Daniel H. Wells, Newel K. Whitney, Charles C. Rich, John T. Barnett, Wilson Law, Don Carlos Smith, John P. Greene, Vinson Knight, Isaac Galland, Elias Higbee, Robert D. Foster, James Adams, Robert B. Thompson, Samuel Bennett, Ebenezer Robinson, John Snider, George Miller, and Lenos M. Knight, Regents of the "University of the City of Nauvoo;" as contemplated in the 24th section of "An Act to incorporate the City of Nauvoo," approved December 16, 1840.

Sec. 2. The board named in the first section of this ordinance, shall hold its first meeting at the office of Joseph Smith, on Tuesday, the 9th day of February, 1841, at 2 o'clock p.m.

Passed February 3, 1841.

John C. Bennett, Mayor.

James Sloan, Recorder.

I also presented a bill for an ordinance organizing the Nauvoo Legion, which passed the same day, as follows:

Sec. 1. Be it ordained by the City Council of the City of Nauvoo, that the inhabitants of the City of Nauvoo, and such citizens of Hancock county as may unite by voluntary enrollment, be, and they are hereby organized into a body of independent military men, to be called the "Nauvoo Legion," as contemplated in the 25th section of "An Act to incorporate the City of Nauvoo," approved December 16, 1840.

Sec. 2. The Legion shall be, and is hereby divided into two cohorts; the horse troops to constitute the first cohort, and the foot troops to constitute the second cohort.

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Sec. 3. The general officers of the Legion shall consist of a lieutenant-general, as the chief commanding and reviewing officer, and president of the court martial and Legion; a major-general, as the second in command in the Legion, the secretary of the court martial and Legion, and adjutant and inspector-general; a brigadier-general, as the commander of the first cohort; and brigadier-general, as commander of the second cohort.

Sec. 4. The staff of the lieutenant-general shall consist of two principal aids-de-camp, with the rank of colonels of cavalry; and a guard of twelve aids-de-camp, with the rank of captain of infantry; and a drill officer, with the rank of colonel of dragoons, who shall likewise be the chief officer of the guard.

Sec. 5. The staff of the major-general shall consist of an adjutant, a surgeon-in-chief, a cornet, a quarter-master, a paymaster, a commissary, and a chaplain, with the rank of colonels of infantry; a surgeon for each cohort, a quarter-master-sergeant, sergeant-major, and chief musician, with the rank of captains of light infantry, and two musicians, with the rank of captains of infantry.

Sec. 6. The staff of each brigadier-general shall consist of one aid-de-camp, with the rank of lieutenant-colonel of infantry, provided that the said brigadiers shall have access to the staff of the major-general, when not otherwise in service.

Sec. 7. No officer shall hereafter be elected by the various companies of the Legion, except upon the nomination of the court-martial; and it is hereby made the duty of the court-martial to nominate at least two candidates for each vacant office, whenever such vacancies occur.

Sec. 8. The court-martial shall fill and supply all offices ranking between captains and brigadier-generals by granting brevet commissions to the most worthy company officers of the line, who shall thereafter take rank, and command according to the date of their brevets, provided that their original place in the line shall not thereby be vacated.

Sec. 9. The court-martial, consisting of all the military officers, commissioned or entitled to commissions, within the limits of the city corporation, shall meet at the office of Joseph Smith, on Thursday, the 4th day of February, 1841, at 10 o'clock a.m.; and then and there proceed to elect the general officers of the Legion, as contemplated in the 3rd section of this ordinance.

Sec. 10. The court-martial shall adopt for the Legion, as nearly as may be, and so far as applicable, the discipline, drill, uniform, rule, and regulations of the United States army.

Passed February 8, 1841.

John C. Bennett, Mayor.

James Sloan, Recorder.

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Joseph Smith, Hyrum Smith, Don C. Smith, and Charles C. Rich were duly sworn as members of the City Council. 3

The following addition has been made to the Charter of the Nauvoo Legion by the legislature—

Any citizen of Hancock county may, by voluntary enrollment, attach himself to the Nauvoo Legion, with all the privileges, which appertain to that independent military body.

I gave a general invitation to my friends to enroll themselves, so as to have a perfect organization by the fourth of July. I was appointed chairman of several committees, viz.: "On the Canal," "For Vacating the Town of Commerce," "Vending Spirituous Liquors," "Code of City Ordinances, "Board of Health," &c. Council adjourned to the 8th.

Thursday, 4.

Minutes of the Meeting which Organized the Nauvoo Legion.

Pursuant to an ordinance of the City Council of the City of Nauvoo, entitled, "An ordinance organizing the Nauvoo Legion," passed February 3, 1841, a court-martial, composed of the commissioned officers of the militia of the state of Illinois, within the city of Nauvoo, assembled at the office of Joseph Smith, on Thursday at 10 o'clock A.M., the 4th day of February, 1841: present—John C. Bennett, quarter-master general of the state of Illinois; Lieutenant-Colonel Don Carlos Smith; Captains Charles C. Rich, Wilson Law, Albert P. Rockwood, William Law, Titus Billings, Stephen Markham; first lieutenants, Francis M. Higbee, John T. Barnett, John D. Parker, Benjamin S. Wilber, Amos Davis; second lieutenants, Chancy L. Higbee, Nelson Higgins, David H. Redfield, Hosea Stout, Stephen Winchester, Thomas Rich; third lieutenants, John C. Annis, and Alexander Badlam. The court was called to order by General Bennett. On motion, Joseph Smith and Hugh McFall were requested to sit in the court. The court-martial then proceeded to the election of the general officers of the Legion; whereupon Joseph Smith was duly elected lieutenant-general of the Nauvoo Legion, and John C. Bennett, major-general. Colonel Wilson Law was elected brigadier-general of the first cohort, and Lieutenant-Colonel Don Carlos Smith brigadier-general of the second cohort, by unanimous vote of the court-martial. Lieutenant-general Joseph Smith, after being duly sworn into office, appointed the following named persons for his staff, to-wit—Captain A. P. Rockwood to be drill officer; Captains William Law and Robert B. Thompson, aids-de-camp; and James Allred, Thomas Grover, C. M. Kreymeyer, John L. Butler, John Snider, Alpheus Cutler, Reynolds Cahoon, Elias Higbee, Henry G. Sherwood, Shadrack Roundy, Samuel H. Smith, and Vinson Knight, guards, and assistant aids-de-camp. The Legion, at its organization, was composed of six companies.

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Friday, 5.—Elder Reuben Hedlock is laboring in Glasgow, Scotland. The Church in that place numbers 55, and the spirit of enquiry increases.

Saturday, 6.

Minutes of a Council at Brother Richard Harrison's, 72 Burlington Street, Liverpool, for organizing a company of Saints going to New Orleans on the ship "Sheffield," Captain Porter.

Elders Brigham Young, Willard Richards, John Taylor, and other officers, present. Elder Hyrum Clark was chosen president, and Thomas Walmsley, Miles Romney, Edward Martin, John Taylor, Francis Clark, and John Riley, counselors to President Clark. Edward Martin, clerk and historian. Peter Maughan and John Taylor were ordained Elders. President Clark and his counselors were blessed and set apart for their mission.

Sunday, 7.—Ship Sheffield sailed from Liverpool with 235 Saints.

Monday, 8.—Levi Richards writes from Lugwardine—

To the Editor of the Star:

Since Stanley Hill conference, I have attended about thirty council meetings of Church officers, in eleven different places in Herefordshire, Gloucestershire, and Worcestershire, making a circuit of nearly one hundred miles. Union and harmony prevail among them, and a disposition to add to their faith. New places are frequently opened for preaching, which is generally supplied. Many are baptized every week, although the ice has to yield its natural claims, and be put aside. The gift of healing is manifested to quite an extent in this region. The gift of tongues is received in most of the branches where I am acquainted. The spirit of persecution is not yet wholly cast out of the world: for recently preaching was held for the first time in Pendock parish, eight miles from Ledbury, when a congregation, respectable in numbers and appearance, were compelled to retire prematurely, in consequence of the quantity of gravel thrown upon the roof and against the windows. The mob were numerous, and pelted the Saints on their way home with mud. The meeting was held at the shop of a tradesman, who had been clerk of the parish, but was so fortunate as to obey the Gospel, and be turned out of his stewardship; and his wife was dismissed from her school, for the same reason, by the parson of the parish. More or less of the Saints are turned out of employ, and out of their houses, for obeying the Gospel.

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Nauvoo Council Opened by Prayer.

City Council met according to adjournment and opened by prayer, which was made a standing rule of the council. I reported a bill for the survey of a canal through the city, which was accepted; and I was appointed to contract for its survey. I also reported a bill for an ordinance on temperance, which was read and laid over.

Wednesday, 10.—Elder James Burnham writes from Overton, Flintshire, North Wales—

I have organized two branches, with about 150 members; and we are continually baptizing, whether it be cold or hot. There is great opposition.

The Echo Company.

Thursday, 11.—Elders Young, Richards, and Taylor, in council at 72 Burlington Street, Liverpool, set apart, by the laying on of hands, Elder Daniel Browett, to take charge of a company of Saints, about to sail for New Orleans on ship Echo, Captain Wood; and John Cheese, David Wilding, James Lavender, William Jenkins, Robert Harris, and John Ellison, to be his counselors. Robert Harris was ordained an Elder, and Elder Browett was appointed clerk and historian of the company.

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Saturday, 13.—Elder Orson Hyde sailed from New York for Liverpool, on his way to Jerusalem, accompanied by Elder George J. Adams.

Sunday, 14.

Minutes of the London Conference.

A conference of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints was held at Barrett's Academy, 57 King Square, Goswell Road, London, on Sunday, the 14th of February, 1841, there being present—Elders Heber C. Kimball, Wilford Woodruff, Lorenzo Snow, William Pitt, and four Priests. The meeting was called to order by Elder Kimball at 2 o'clock P.M. Moved by Elder Kimball, seconded by Elder Pitt, that Elder Woodruff be president of this conference; carried unanimously. Moved by Elder Kimball, seconded by Elder Woodruff, that Dr. W. Copeland be clerk; carried unanimously. The meeting opened by Elder Kimball with prayer and singing. The president then called upon the official members to represent their respective branches. The church at Ipswich was represented by Elder Pitt, as consisting of twelve members, one Elder, one Priest, and one Teacher. The church at Bedford was represented by Robert Williams, Priest, as consisting of forty-two members, one Priest, seven moved, two died. The church at Woolwich was represented by John Griffith, Priest, as consisting of six members, one Priest. The church in London was represented by Elder Kimball as consisting of forty-six members, one Elder, two Priests: excellent prospects of a continued increase. James Allen was ordained an Elder, and Thomas Barnes a Priest. Robert Williams was ordained an Elder, to preside over the branch at Bedford; and William Smith and John Sheffield were ordained Priests. Richard Bates was ordained a Priest, in the branch of Woolwich, and A. Painter a Teacher—all under the hands of Elders Kimball, Woodruff and Snow. It was then moved by Elder Kimball, seconded by Elder Woodruff, that Elder Snow be appointed president of this [the Woolwich] conference, also to take the superintendency of the branch in London. Much valuable instruction was given by Elders Kimball and Woodruff in relation to the duties of the official members. It was then moved by Elder Kimball, and seconded by Elder Snow, that this conference be adjourned to Sunday, 16th of May, 1841. The conference was then closed at half-past five, by singing and prayer.

Dr. W. Copeland, Clerk.

Monday, 15.—As chairman of the committee [on the vending of spirituous liquors] I reported a bill to the City Council, which, after a long discussion, passed into "An ordinance in relation to temperance."

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Ordinance.

Sec. 1. Be it ordained by the City Council of the City of Nauvoo, that all persons and establishments whatever, in this city, are prohibited from vending whisky in a less quantity than a gallon, or other spirituous liquors in a less quantity than a quart, to any person whatever, excepting on the recommendation of a physician, duly accredited in writing, by the Chancellor and Regents of the University of the City of Nauvoo; and any person guilty of any act contrary to the prohibition contained in this ordinance, shall, on conviction thereof before the Mayor or municipal court, be fined in any sum not exceeding twenty-five dollars, at the discretion of said Mayor or municipal court; and any person or persons who shall attempt to evade this ordinance by giving away liquor, or by any other means, shall be considered alike amenable, and fined as aforesaid.

Passed February 15, 1841.

John C. Bennett, Mayor.

James Sloan, Recorder.

In the discussion of the foregoing bill, I spoke at great length on the use of liquors, and showed that they were unnecessary, and operate as a poison in the stomach, and that roots and herbs can be found to effect all necessary purposes.

Tuesday, 16.

Missouri's "White-washing."

Resolved by the Senate [of the state of Missouri], the House of Representatives concurring, that two thousand copies of the evidence taken before the examining court in relation to "Mormon" difficulties, and such of the letters, orders, and correspondence on that subject, on file in the office of the secretary of state, as may be selected by a joint committee of the two houses, shall be published in pamphlet form, under the direction of the secretary of state; that one copy, in lieu of the manuscript copies, heretofore ordered, be sent to our delegation in Congress, to be laid before the House to which they respectively belong, one to each member of Congress, and the residue be distributed among the Mormons of the general assembly.

Approved February 16, 1841. 4

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Is this Missouri's last struggle to retrieve her lost character to publish to the world a one-sided statement of her robberies, murders, and extermination which she had committed without provocation, at a time when not one Saint was left in Missouri to tell the truth about them?

The ship Echo sailed from Liverpool for New Orleans, with 109 Saints, led by Daniel Browett.

Saturday, 20.—Elder Brigham Young went to Harwarden and preached twice on Sunday.

Elders William Kay and Thomas Richardson introduced the Gospel into the City of Hereford.

The court-martial of the Nauvoo Legion, by a unanimous vote, adopted the following resolutions, to-wit—

Legion Resolutions.

That no person whatever, residing within the limits of the City of Nauvoo, between the ages of 18 and 45 years, excepting such as are exempted by the laws of the United States, shall be exempt from military duty, unless exempted by a special act of this court; and the fines for neglecting or refusing to appear on the days of general parade were fixed at the following rates: for generals, $25; colonels, $20; captains, $15; lieutenants, $10; and musicians and privates, $5; and for company parade at the following rates—for commissioned officers, $5; non-commissioned officers, $3; musicians and privates, $2. The 1st and 6th of April, and the 3rd of July, were fixed upon as days for general parade for this year.

Ordered that Edward P. Duzette enlist and organize a band of music, not exceeding twenty men. It was also reported that John Scott had been elected captain in the place of William Law, and Lieutenant Hosea Stout in the place of Albert P. Rockwood, who has been promoted.

Monday, 22.—I laid before the City Council the following—

Resolution.

Resolved by the City Council of the City of Nauvoo, that the freedom of the city be, and the same hereby is, conferred on the present Governor, lieutenant-governor, council of revision, and members of both houses of the general assembly, of the state of Illinois, as an evidence of our gratitude for their great liberality and kindness to this community, during the present winter, which was adopted unanimously.

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I also presented the following bill for "An ordinance in relation to the University."

Ordinance.

Sec. 1. Be it ordained by the City Council of the City of Nauvoo, that all matters and powers whatever in relation to common schools, and all other institutions of learning within the City of Nauvoo be, and the same hereby are transferred from the City Council of the City of Nauvoo, to the chancellor and regents of the University of the City of Nauvoo.

Passed February 22, 1841.

John C. Bennett, Mayor.

James Sloan, Recorder.

Tuesday, 23.—Elder Kington writes from Bristol, England, that eight have been baptized in that place.

An Act to Incorporate the Nauvoo House Association.

Sec. 1. Be it enacted by the people of the state of Illinois, represented in the general assembly, that George Miller, Lyman Wight, John Snider, and Peter Haws, and their associates, are hereby declared a body corporate, under the name and style of the "Nauvoo House Association;" and they are hereby authorized to erect and furnish a public house of entertainment, to be called the "Nauvoo House."

Sec. 2. The above-named George Miller, Lyman Wight, John Snider, and Peter Haws, and their associates, are hereby declared to be the trustees of the association, with full power and authority to hold in joint tenancy, by themselves and their successors in office, a certain lot in the City of Nauvoo, in the county of Hancock, and state of Illinois, known and designated on the plat of said city, as the south half of lot numbered fifty-six, for the purpose of erecting thereon the house contemplated in the first section of this act.

Sec. 3. The said trustees are further authorized and empowered to obtain by stock subscription, by themselves or their duly authorized agents, the sum of one hundred and fifty thousand dollars, which shall be divided into shares of fifty dollars each.

Sec. 4. No individual shall be permitted to hold more than three hundred, nor less than one share of stock, and certificates of stock shall be delivered to subscribers, so soon as their subscriptions are paid in and not before.

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Sec. 5. As soon as the contemplated house shall have been completed and furnished, the stockholders shall appoint such agents as the trustees may deem necessary in the management of the affairs of said association.

Sec. 6. The trustees shall have power to sue and be sued, plead and be impleaded in any court in this state, in the name and style of the "Trustees of the Nauvoo House Association."

Sec. 7. They shall also take the general care and supervision in procuring materials for said house, and constructing and erecting the same, and further to superintend its general management, and to do and perform all matters and things which may be necessary to be done, in order to secure the interest and promote the objects of this association.

Sec. 8. This association shall continue twenty years from the passage of this act, and the house herein provided for shall be kept for the accommodation of strangers, travelers, and all other persons who may resort therein for rest and refreshment.

Sec. 9. It is moreover established as a perpetual rule of said house, to be observed by all persons who may keep or occupy the same that spirituous liquors of every description are prohibited, and that such liquor shall never be vended as a beverage, or introduced into common use, in said house.

Sec. 10. And whereas Joseph Smith has furnished the said association with the ground whereon to erect said house, it is further declared that the said Smith and his heirs shall hold, by perpetual succession, a suite of rooms in the said house, to be set apart and conveyed in due form of law to him and his heirs by the said trustees, as soon as the same are completed.

Sec. 11. The Board of Trustees shall appoint one of their number as president thereof.

Approved February 23, 1841.

Thomas Carlin,

Governor.

W. L. D. Ewing,

Speaker of the House of Representatives.

S.H. Anderson,

Speaker of the Senate.

State of Illinois,

Office of Secretary of State, s.s.

I, Stephen A. Douglas, Secretary of State, do hereby certify the foregoing to be a true and perfect copy of the enrolled law on file in my office.

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Witness my hand and the seal of State.

Springfield, February 24, A. D. 1841.

[SEAL.]

S. A. Douglas,

Secretary of State.

An Act to Incorporate the Nauvoo Agricultural and Manufacturing Association in the County of Hancock.

Sec. 1. Be it enacted by the people of the state of Illinois, represented in the general assembly, that Sidney Rigdon, George W. Robinson, Samuel James, Wilson Law, Daniel H. Wells, Hyrum Smith, George Miller, William Marks, Peter Haws, Vinson Knight, John Scott, Don Carlos Smith, William Huntington, Sen., Ebenezer Robinson, Robert B. Thompson, William Law, James Allred, John T. Barnett, Theodore Turley, John C. Bennett, Elias Higbee, Isaac Higbee, Joseph Smith, Alpheus Cutler, Israel Barlow, R. D. Foster, John F. Olney, John Snider, Leonard Soby, Orson Pratt, James Kelley, Sidney A. Knowlton, John P. Greene, John F. Weld, and their associates and successors, are hereby constituted a body corporate and politic, by the name of "The Nauvoo Agricultural and Manufacturing Association," and by that name shall be capable of suing and being sued, pleading and being impleaded, answering and being answered, in all courts and places, and may have a common seal, and may alter the same at pleasure.

Sec. 2. The sole object and purpose of said association shall be for the promotion of agriculture and husbandry in all its branches, and for the manufacture of flour, lumber, and such other useful articles as are necessary for the ordinary purposes of life.

Sec. 3. The capital stock of said association shall be one hundred thousand dollars, with the privilege of increasing it to the sum of three hundred thousand dollars, to be divided into shares of fifty dollars, which shall be considered personal property, and be assignable in such manner as the said corporation may, by its by-laws, provide; which capital stock shall be exclusively devoted to the object and purposes set forth in the second section of this act, and to no other object and purposes, and to the same end the said corporation shall have power to purchase, hold, and convey real estate, and other property, to the amount of its capital.

Sec. 4. Said corporation shall have power, by the trustees, or a majority of them present at any regularly called meeting, to make by-laws for its own government, for the purpose of carrying out the objects of this association, provided the same are not repugnant to the laws and constitution of this state, or of the United States.

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Sec. 5. Joseph Smith, Sidney Rigdon, and William Law shall be commissioners to receive subscriptions for, and distribute said capital stock for said corporation; said commissioners, or a majority of them, shall, within six months after the passage of this act, either by themselves or their duly appointed agents, open a subscription book for said stock at such times and places as they shall appoint, and at the time of subscription for such stock, at least ten per cent upon each share subscribed for, shall be paid to said commissioners, or their duly appointed agents; and the remainder of said stock, so subscribed for, shall be paid in such sums, and at such times, as shall be provided for by the by-laws of said corporation.

Sec. 6. In case the stock of said corporation shall not all be taken up within one year from the passage of this act, the duties of said commissioners shall cease, and the trustees of said corporation, or a quorum thereof, may thereafter receive subscriptions to said stock, from time to time, until the whole shall be subscribed.

Sec. 7. The stock, property, and concerns of said corporation shall be managed by twenty trustees, who shall be stockholders of said corporation, any five of whom, to be designated by a majority of the trustees, shall form a quorum for the transaction of all ordinary business of said corporation, the election of which trustees shall be annual. The first mentioned twenty persons, whose names are recited in the first section of this act, shall be the first trustees of said corporation, and shall hold their offices until the first Monday in September, A. D. 1841, and until others shall be elected in their places.

Sec. 8. The trustees of said corporation for every subsequent year shall be elected on the first Monday in September, in each and every year, at such place as the trustees for the time being shall appoint, and of which election they shall give at least fifteen days previous notice by advertisement in some newspaper, in or near the City of Nauvoo. At every election of trustees, each stockholder shall be entitled to one vote on each share of stock owned by him: provided that no stockholder shall be entitled to more than twenty votes, and said stockholders, may vote either in person or by proxy. The election for trustees shall be conducted in such manner as shall be pointed out by the by-laws of said corporation, and whenever a vacancy shall happen by death, resignation, or otherwise, among the trustees, the remaining trustees shall have power to fill such vacancy, until the next general election for trustees.

Sec. 9. The trustees of said corporation, as soon as may be, after their appointment or election under this act, shall proceed to elect, out of their number, a president, treasurer, and secretary, who shall respectively hold their offices during one year, and until others shall be elected to fill their places, and whose duties shall be defined and prescribed by the by-laws of the corporation; and said trustees shall also appoint such agents and other persons as may be necessary to conduct the proper business, and accomplish the declared objects of said corporation, and shall likewise have power to fill any vacancy occasioned by the death, resignation, or removal of any officer of said corporation.

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Sec. 10. This act shall be construed as a public act, and continue in force for the period of twenty years. And the trustees appointed under the provisions of this act, shall hold their first meeting at the City of Nauvoo, on the first Monday of April, A. D. 1841.

Approved February 27, 1841.

Thomas Carlin,

Governor.

W. L. D. Ewing,

Speaker of the House of Representatives.

S. H. Anderson.

Speaker of the Senate.

State of Illinois, Office of Secretary of State.

I, Lyman Trumbull, Secretary of State, do hereby certify the foregoing to be a true and perfect copy of the enrolled law on the file in my office.

Given Under My Hand And Seal Of State, Springfield, March 10, 1841.

Lyman Trumbull,

Secretary of State.

Wednesday, 24.—Elder Brigham Young returned to Liverpool, and on the 25th attended a patriarchal blessing meeting at Brother Dumville's. Father Melling officiated; Elder James Whitehead, scribe.

Saturday, 27.—President Brigham Young went to Manchester, and preached in Lombard Street room on Sunday, the 28th.

Divisions of Nauvoo into Municipal Wards.

Monday, March 1.—The City Council divided the city into four wards, at my suggestion, to-wit: all the district of country within the city limits, north of the center of Knight street, and west of the center of Wells street, shall constitute the first ward. North of the center of Knight street and east of the center of Wells street, the second ward. South of the center of Knight street, and east of the center of Wells street, the third ward. South of the center of Knight street, and west of the center of Wells street, the fourth ward.

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I attended the City Council, and presented a bill for "An ordinance in relation to Religious Societies."

Ordinance on Religious Liberty in Nauvoo.

Sec. 1. Be it ordained by the City Council of the City of Nauvoo, that the Catholics, Presbyterians, Methodists, Baptists, Latter-day Saints, Quakers, Episcopals, Universalists, Unitarians, Mohammedans, and all other religious sects and denominations whatever, shall have free toleration, and equal privileges, in this city; and should any person be guilty of ridiculing, and abusing or otherwise depreciating another in consequence of his religion, or of disturbing or interrupting any religious meeting within the limits of this city, he shall, on conviction thereof before the Mayor or Municipal Court, be considered a disturber of the public peace, and fined in any sum not exceeding five hundred dollars, or imprisoned not exceeding six months, or both, at the discretion of said Mayor or Court.

Sec. 2. It is hereby made the duty of all Municipal officers to notice and report to the Mayor any breach or violation of this, or any other ordinance of this city, that may come within their knowledge, or of which they may be advised; and any officer aforesaid, is hereby fully authorized to arrest all such violators of rule, law and order, either with or without process.

Passed March 1, 1841.

John C. Bennett, Mayor.

James Sloan, Recorder.

I also presented a bill as follows:

An Ordinance in Relation to Public Meetings.

Sec. 1. Be it ordained by the City Council of the City of Nauvoo, that in order to guarantee the constitutional right of free discussion upon all subjects, the citizens of this city, may from time to time peaceably assemble themselves together for all peaceable or lawful purposes whatever; and should any person be guilty of disturbing or interrupting any such meeting or assemblage, he shall on conviction thereof before the Mayor or Municipal Court, be considered a disturber of the public peace, and fined in any sum not exceeding five hundred dollars, or imprisoned not exceeding six months, or both, at the discretion of said mayor or court.

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Sec. 2. Should any person be guilty of exciting the people to riot or rebellion, or of participating in a mob, or any other unlawful riotous or tumultuous assemblage of the people, or of refusing to obey any civil officer, executing the ordinances of the city, or the general laws of the state or United States, or of neglecting or refusing to obey promptly, any military order for the due execution of said law or ordinances, he shall, on conviction thereof as aforesaid, be fined or imprisoned, or both, as aforesaid.

Passed March 1, 1841.

John C. Bennett, Mayor.

James Sloan, Recorder.

I also offered a bill for "An ordinance, creating certain additional City Officers."

Ordinance.

Sec. 1. Be it ordained by the City Council of the City of Nauvoo, that in addition to the city officers heretofore elected, there shall be elected by the City Council, one high constable for each ward; one surveyor and engineer, one market master, one weigher and sealer, and one collector for the city, whose duties shall hereafter be defined by ordinance.

Passed March 1, 1841.

John C. Bennett, Mayor.

James Sloan, Recorder.

I presented the following report:

Committee's Report.

Your committee, to whom was referred that portion of the address of his honor, the Mayor, which recommended the propriety of vacating the town plats, Commerce, and the City of Commerce, and incorporating them with the city plat of Nauvoo, would respectfully report—That they consider the recommendation contained in the address as one of great importance to the future welfare and prosperity of this city, and if carried into effect would make the streets regular and uniform, and materially tend to beautify this city. We would therefore respectfully recommend that the survey of the City of Nauvoo be carried through the town plats of Commerce and the City of Commerce, as soon as it may be practicable.

We would therefore recommend to the council the passage of the following resolution—That the town plats of Commerce, and Commerce City be vacated, and that the same stand vacated from this time forth, and forever; and that the same be incorporated with the City of Nauvoo, from this time henceforth and forever.

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All of which is respectfully submitted.

Joseph Smith, Chairman.

The report was received and adopted, and an ordinance passed accordingly.

A vote of thanks, and the freedom of the city were conferred on the Honorable Richard M. Young, United States Senator for Illinois.

Tuesday, 2.—Elder Brigham Young visited Oldham, and returned on Wednesday, 3rd, to Manchester. Elders Orson Hyde and George J. Adams arrived in Liverpool.

Thursday, 4.—Elder Willard Richards left Liverpool for Preston, and was followed by Elders Hyde, Adams, and Fielding on the 5th.

General William Henry Harrison was inaugurated President of the United States.

Friday, 5.—Elder Parley P. Pratt removed the Star office to 47 Oxford Road, Manchester.

Sunday, 7.—Elders Young and Kimball preached at the Carpenter's Hall, Manchester.

Appointment of City Officers.

Monday, 8.—I attended the City Council. The following appointments were made viz: Alanson Ripley, city surveyor; Theodore Turley, weigher and sealer; James Robinson, assessor; Stephen Markham, market master; James Allred was sworn supervisor of streets, and James Allred, Dimick B. Huntington, and George Morey, high constables.

I gave my views on several local measures proposed by the council.

Wednesday, 10.

Letter of Brigham Young to the Editor of the Star—On Family Prayer.

Liverpool, March 10, 1841.

To the Editor of the Star:

Dear Brother:—I feel anxious to address a few lines to you, on the subject of family prayer (and shall feel obliged by your inserting the same in your next Star), for the purpose of imparting instruction to the brethren in general. Having traveled through many branches of the Church in England, I have found it to be a general custom among the brethren I visited, that when any of the Traveling Elders are present, they wait for the Elder to go forward in family prayer, instead of attending to that duty themselves. That is not right; and I would say to them that it would be better for them to understand their duty on this subject. My dear brethren, remember that the Lord holds all of us responsible for our conduct here. He held our father Adam responsible for his conduct, but no more than He does us, in proportion to the station we hold. The kings of the earth will have to give an account to God, for their conduct in a kingly capacity. Kings are heads of nations, governors are heads of provinces; so are fathers or husbands governors of their own houses, and should act accordingly. Heads of families should always take the charge of family worship, and call their family together at a seasonable hour, and not wait for every person to get through with all they may have to say or do. If it were my prerogative to adopt a plan for family prayer, it would be the following: Call your family or household together every morning and evening, previous to coming to the table, and bow before the Lord to offer up your thanksgiving for His mercies and providential care of you. Let the head of the family dictate; I mean the man, not the woman. If an Elder should happen to be present, the head of the house can call upon him, if he chooses so to do, and not wait for a stranger to take the lead at such times; by so doing we shall obtain the favor of our Heavenly Father, and it will have a tendency to teach our children to walk in the way they should go, which may God grant for Christ's sake. Amen.

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Brigham Young.

Governor Carlin issued the following Commission—

Appointment of Joseph Smith Lieutenant-General of the Nauvoo Legion.

Thomas Carlin, Governor of the State of Illinois, to all to whom these presents shall come: Greeting

Know ye that Joseph Smith, having been duly elected to the office of lieutenant-general, Nauvoo Legion, of the militia of the State of Illinois, I, Thomas Carlin, governor of said state, do commission him lieutenant-general of the Nauvoo Legion, to take rank from the fifth day of February, 1841. He is, therefore, carefully and diligently to discharge the duties of said office, by doing and performing all manner of things thereunto belonging; and I do strictly require all officers and soldiers under his command to be obedient to his orders: and he is to obey such orders and directions as he shall receive, from time to time, from the commander-in-chief or his superior officer.

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In testimony whereof, I have hereunto set my hand, and caused the great seal of state to be hereunto affixed. Done at Springfield, this tenth day of March, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and forty-one, and of the independence of the United States the sixty-fifth.

By the Governor,

[SEAL]

Thomas Carlin.

Lyman Trumball,

Secretary of State.

The commission was endorsed on the back as follows—

Headquarters, Nauvoo Legion, City of Nauvoo, Illinois, March 15, 1841—Oath of office administered by me, the day and year above written.

John C. Bennett,

Major-General of the Nauvoo Legion.

Thursday, 11.—Elders Young, Kimball, Richards, and Taylor met in Liverpool.

Monday, 15.—I attended the City Council, and took part in the discussion concerning Mr. Annis' mill, in the southwest part of the city.

Elder Wilford Woodruff attended a conference at Gadfield Elm; 408 members in eighteen branches represented.

Thursday, 16.—Elder George A. Smith attended a conference at Macclesfield, which branch contains ninety one members, one Elder, six Priests, five Teachers, and three Deacons. In consequence of incessant preaching, his lungs are much affected.

Wednesday, 17.—Ship Alesto sailed from Liverpool for New Orleans, with 54 Saints, led by Elders Thomas Smith and William Moss.

Elders Heber C. Kimball, Willard Richards, and Father Melling went to Preston; Elders Young and Hedlock to Hawarden, and George A. Smith to Leek.

Thursday, 18.—Elder George A. Smith attended a council of the officers and members of the Church at Leek, numbering sixty-three members, one Elder, six Priests, two Teachers, and two Deacons. Stephen Nixon was ordained an Elder; and John Hudson, Jacob Gibson, and Joseph Knight Priests; and Frederick Rushton and Edwin Rushton, Teachers.

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Saturday, 20.

An Inquiry.

City Of Nauvoo, March 20, 1841.

Brother William Allred, Bishop of the stake at Pleasant Vale, and also Brother Henry W. Miller, president of the stake at Freedom, desire President Joseph Smith to inquire of the Lord His will concerning them.

I inquired of the Lord concerning the foregoing question, and received the following answer—

Revelation. 5

Let my servants, William Allred and Henry W. Miller, have an agency for the selling of stock for the Nauvoo House, and assist my servants Lyman Wight, Peter Haws, George Miller, and John Snider, in building said house; and let my servants William Allred and Henry W. Miller take stock in the house, that the poor of my people may have employment, and that accommodations may be made for the strangers who shall come to visit this place, and for this purpose let them devote all their properties, saith the Lord.

About this time I received a revelation, given in the City of Nauvoo, in answer to the following interrogatory—"what is the will of the Lord, concerning the Saints in the Territory of Iowa?"

Revelation.

"Verily, thus saith the Lord, I say unto you, if those who call themselves by my name, and are essaying to be my Saints, if they will do my will and keep my commandments concerning them; let them gather themselves together, unto the place which I shall appoint unto them by my servant Joseph, and build up cities unto my name, that they may be prepared for that which is in store for a time to come. Let them build up a city unto my name upon the land opposite to the City of Nauvoo, and let the name of Zarahemla be named upon it. And let all those who come from the east, and the west, and the north, and the south, that have desires to dwell therein, take up their inheritances in the same, as well as in the City of Nashville, or in the City of Nauvoo, and in all the stakes which I have appointed, saith the Lord.

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Sunday, 21.—Elder George A. Smith preached at Leek, and confirmed one.

Organization of the Lesser Priesthood at Nauvoo.

The Lesser Priesthood was organized in the City of Nauvoo, March 21, 1841, by Bishops Whitney, Miller, Higbee, and Knight. Samuel Rolf was chosen president of the Priests' quorum, and Stephen Markham and Hezekiah Peck, his counselors. Elisha Everett was chosen president of Teachers, and James W. Huntsman and James Hendricks, counselors. Phinehas R. Bird was chosen president of Deacons, and David Wood and William W. Lane counselors.

Chapter 15.

1. See Doctrine and Covenants 124.

2. The foregoing speech is not printed in the "History of Joseph Smith" as published in the Deseret News and Millennial Star, but such is the prominence of John C. Bennett in the period of the history now reached, and such the despicable part he later plays, that, as affording an insight into his character, the speech becomes important, hence given here in extenso, as it was published in the Times and Seasons, Vol. 2, No. 8.

3. Following is the form of oath taken:

We, Joseph Smith, Hyrum Smith, Don C. Smith, and Charles C. Rich, do solemnly swear in the presence of Almighty God that we will support the constitution of the United States, and of the State of Illinois, and that we will well and truly perform the duties of councilors of the city of Nauvoo, according to law, and the best of our abilities.

Joseph Smith,

Hyrum Smith,

Don C. Smith,

Charles C. Rich.

December 3, 1841.

4. For a proper characterization of this document see Vol. 3, this History, p. 256.

5. See Doctrine and Covenants 125.