Volume 4 Chapter 7 | BYU Studies

Volume 4 Chapter 7

 

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Chapter 7

First Foreign Periodical of the Church, "The Millennial Star"—The Prophet Seeks Release from Secular Responsibilities.

Sunday, May 17.—Elders Young, Woodruff, and Richards held conference with the Saints at Gadfield Elm Chapel.

The Beacon Hill Conference.

Monday, 18.—The above Elders met the brethren at Elder Kington's, where they had a tea party, praying, singing, confirming, ordaining, and about twenty were baptized; thus they continued their labors from place to place, until Wednesday 20th, when they found themselves with one accord on the top of "the Herefordshire Beacon," 1 and within the old fortification, when after prayer they expressed their feelings concerning the business of the Church, which were (as they had obtained money from Brother John Benbow, and other brethren for printing the hymnbook, and in part sufficient for the Book of Mormon) that Elder Young repair immediately to Manchester, and join his brethren previously appointed with him on a committee, for the printing of the hymn-book, and cause 3,000 copies to be issued without delay. Also that the same committee cause 3,000 copies of the Book of Mormon to be printed and completed with as little delay as possible, with an index affixed to the same, the form of the book to be determined by the committee. Their views were written and signed by Elder Willard Richards and Wilford Woodruff, when President Young left direct for Manchester. He saw George A. Smith, at the Potteries, who approved the "Beacon Conference."

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Sunday, 24.—President Young met with the Church, and on Monday, 25th, visited the printers to inquire their prices, etc.

A Letter of Heber C. Kimball, et al., Recommending English Saints to the Bishop of the Church.

Preston, May 25, 1840.

To the Presidency, High Council and Bishop of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints at Commerce. We commend to your notice the brethren and sisters that have commendatory letters from us of this date, that you will do all that you consistently can for them, for I verily believe they have utmost confidence in you, and will receive with gratitude your advice and instruction, and cheerfully submit to the rules and regulations of the Church. They have our blessings, and we trust their subsequent conduct will entitle them to your blessings also, and the Church generally. We rejoice that we can say the work of God here is in a prosperous way. Yea, we rejoice greatly at the aspect of the times, expecting the time to be not far distant when the standard of truth will be conspicuously raised throughout this land. We have witnessed the flowing of the Saints towards Zion; the stream has begun, and we expect to see it continue running until it shall have drained the salt, or the light, from Babylon, when we hope to shout hosanna home.

Dear brethren, accept our love, and present it to the Church.

Your brethren in the new and everlasting covenant,

Heber C. Kimball,

Joseph Fielding,

William Clayton.

Tuesday, 26.——Elder John Taylor arrived at Manchester, and on the 27th, Elder Kimball arrived. The committee on the hymn-book commenced and continued selecting hymns until the 30th, when Elders Young, Kimball and Taylor went to Liverpool, and preached on Sunday the 31st.

Death of Bishop Partridge.

Wednesday, 27.—Bishop Edward Partridge 2 died at Nauvoo, aged forty-six years. He lost his life in consequence of the Missouri persecutions, and he is one of that number whose blood will be required at their hands. His daughter, Harriet Pamela, died on the 16th of May, aged nineteen years.

First Number of the Millenial Star.

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The first number of The Latter-day Saints' Millennial Star 3 was issued at Manchester, in pamphlet form of twenty-four pages. Edited by Parley P. Pratt. Price sixpence. Office 149 Oldham Road.

Monday, June 1, 1840.—The Saints have already erected about two hundred and fifty-houses at Nauvoo, mostly block houses, a few framed, and many more are in course of construction.

The Gospel is spreading through the States, Canada, England, Scotland, and other places, with great rapidity.

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Elders Young and Kimball were engaged in blessing the brethren who were about to sail for America.

Wednesday, 3.—Elders Young and Taylor visited the printers in Liverpool and Elder Young preached on the Sunday following.

The First Company of Saints from England.

Saturday, 6.—Elder John Moon and a company of forty Saints, to wit., Hugh Moon, his mother and seven others of her family, Henry Moon (uncle of John Moon), Henry Moon, Francis Moon, William Sutton, William Sitgraves, Richard Eaves, Thomas Moss, Henry Moore, Nancy Ashworth, Richard Ainscough, and families, sailed in the ship Britannia from Liverpool for New York, being the first Saints that have sailed from England for Zion.

Monday, 8.—Elders Young and Taylor visited Cheshire, and on Tuesday, Manchester, and continued to select hymns.

Brigham Young's Dreams.

Elder Young dreamed of his family in health and want, also of the Church and people, and of a contention between two small companies in the west, one north, the other south—the north prevailing from time to time.

Minutes of the Conference Held at Gadfield Elm Chapel, in Worcestershire, England, June 14th, 1840.

The preachers and members of the Bran Green and Gadfield Elm Branch of the Froomes Hill Circuit, of the United Brethren met at the Gadfield Elm Chapel, Worcestershire, June 14th, 1840, pursuant to previous notice, when the meeting was called to order by Elder Thomas Kington. Elder Willard Richards was chosen president, and Elder Daniel Browett clerk for the meeting. The meeting was opened by prayer by Elder Wilford Woodruff. Remarks were then made by the president respecting the business of the day, and the necessary changes which must take place.

It was then moved by Elder Thomas Kington, seconded by Elder Daniel Browett that this meeting be hereafter known by the name of the "Bran Green and Gadfield Elm Conference of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints," organized and established by the will and commandment of God in the United States of America, on the 6th day of April, A. D. 1830, this being the eighth day of the third month of the eleventh year of the rise of the Church. Carried unanimously.

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[This motion was permitted to accommodate the feelings of the conference, who had all recently been baptized, but there is no such principle in existence, as to transform a church or conference of the world into a church or conference of Christ's fold by vote.] 4

Moved by Elder Wilford Woodruff, seconded by Elder T. Kington, that William Jenkins be ordained an Elder; and William Coleman, Joseph Firkins, William Pitt and Robert Harris be ordained to the office of Priest; and that George Burton, James Palmer, and William Loveridge, be ordained Teachers; carried unanimously. Ordained under the hands of Elders Richards and Woodruff.

Moved by Elder Kington, seconded by Elder Woodruff, that Robert Clift, Priest, have the care of the church at Dymock; James Palmer, Priest, have the care of the church at Kilcott; John Hill, Priest, have the care of the church at Twigworth; William Coleman, Priest, have the care of the church at Bran Green; Thomas Brooks, Priest, have the care of the church at Ryton; John Smith, Priest, have the care of the church at Lime Street; Charles Hayes, Priest have the care of the church at Deerhurst; Thomas Smith, Priest, Assistant, have the care of the church at Deerhurst; John Vernon, Priest, have the care of the church at Apperley; William Bayliss, Priest, Assistant, have the care of the church at Apperley; John Arlick, Priest, have the care of the church at Norton; John Spires, Priest, have the care of the church at Leigh; John Davis, Priest, assistant, have the care of the church at Leigh; Thomas Oakley, Priest, have the care of the church at Gadfield Elm.

And that Elder Daniel Browett take charge of the churches on the south, and Elder William Jenkins on the north side, of the river Severn. Carried unanimously.

Moved by Elder Woodruff, and seconded by Elder Richards, that Elder Thomas Kington be the Presiding Elder over the Conference; carried. Meeting adjourned until two o'clock.

Conference met at two o'clock according to adjournment, and administered the sacrament to a large congregation of Saints, accompanied by many observations on many subjects by the President. Ten members were confirmed under the hands of Elders Woodruff and Kington. Remarks were made by the President respecting the "blessing of children." Seven children were then blessed under the hands of Elders Woodruff and Kington.

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Moved by Elder Kington, seconded by Elder Woodruff, that Elder Daniel Browett represent this Conference to the general conference, at Manchester, on the 6th day of July next; carried. Moved and carried that the Clerk present to the Presiding Elder, T. Kington, also to the general conference, for safe keeping, a copy of the minutes of this conference.

The above minutes were then read and adopted, article by article, when it was moved by the President, and seconded by Elder Woodruff, that this conference be adjourned to the 13th day of September next at this place; carried unanimously.

Conference closed by prayer; after which the Elders and officers present met in council, and voted unanimously to establish a weekly council of the officers of said conference to be held alternately on the south and north sides of the river Severn, to commence at Leigh on the 25th inst.; and organized the same by appointing Elder Daniel Browett, president and John Hill, Priest, clerk, on the south side of the river; and also on the north side, by appointing Elder William Jenkins, president and John Smith, Priest, clerk; to assemble on the 3rd of July next, at Turkey Hall.

After passing many other votes of minor importance, accompanied by much instruction from Elders Richards and Woodruff, touching the duties of the several officers in their relations to each other, and the Church, the council adjourned. And it is worthy of remark, that no dissenting vote or voice was seen or heard during the day, either in conference or council.

Willard Richards, President.

Daniel Browett, Clerk.

Memorial of Joseph Smith, Jun., to the High Council of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, June 18th, 1840.

The Memorial of Joseph Smith, Jun., respectfully represents—That after the members of the Church of Jesus Christ had been inhumanly as well as unconstitutionally expelled from their homes which they had secured to themselves in the state of Missouri, and although very much scattered and at considerable distance from each other, they found a resting place in the state of Illinois:—That after the escape of your Memorialist from his enemies, he (under the direction of the authorities of the Church) took such steps as has secured to the Church the present locations, viz., the town plot of Nauvoo and lands in the Iowa territory:—That in order to secure said locations, your Memorialist had to become responsible for the payment of the same, and had to use considerable exertion in order to commence a settlement, and a place of gathering for the Saints; and knowing from the genius of the constitution of the Church, and for the well-being of the Saints, that it was necessary that the constituted authorities of the Church might assemble together to act or to legislate for the good of the whole society and that the Saints might enjoy those privileges which they could not enjoy by being scattered so widely apart—your Memorialist was induced to exert himself to the utmost in order to bring about objects so necessary and so desirable to the Saints at large:—Under the then existing circumstances, your Memorialist had necessarily to engage in the temporalities of the Church, which he has had to attend to until the present time:—That your Memorialist feels it a duty which he owes to God, as well as to the Church, to give his attention more particularly to those things connected with the spiritual welfare of the Saints, (which have now become a great people,) so that they may be built up in their most holy faith, and go on to perfection:—That the Church have erected an office where he can attend to the affairs of the Church without distraction, he thinks, and verily believes, that the time has now come, when he should devote himself exclusively to those things which relate to the spiritualities of the Church, and commence the work of translating the Egyptian records, the Bible, and wait upon the Lord for such revelations as may be suited to the conditions and circumstances of the Church. And in order that he may be enabled to attend to those things, he prays your honorable body will relieve him from the anxiety and trouble necessarily attendant on business transactions, by appointing some one to take charge of the city plot, and attend to the business transactions which have heretofore rested upon your Memorialist: That should your Honors deem it proper to do so, your Memorialist would respectfully suggest that he would have no means of support whatever, and therefore would request that some one might be appointed to see that all his necessary wants may be provided for, as well as sufficient means or appropriations for a clerk or clerks, which he may require to aid him in his important work.

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Your Memorialist would further represent, that as Elder H. G. Sherwood is conversant with the affairs of the city plot, he would be a suitable person to act as clerk in that business, and attend to the disposing of the remaining lots, &c.

Your Memorialist would take this opportunity of congratulating your honorable body on the peace and harmony which exist in the Church, and for the good feelings which seem to be manifested by all the Saints, and hopes that inasmuch as we devote ourselves for the good of the Church, and the spread of the kingdom, that the choicest blessings of heaven will be poured upon us, and that the glory of the Lord will overshadow the inheritances of the Saints.

Joseph Smith, Jun.

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Proceedings of the High Council on the Foregoing Memorial, June 20th, 1840.

The Council relieved President Joseph Smith, Jun., according to his request in the memorial, and appointed H. G. Sherwood to take charge of the city plot and to act as clerk in that business, and also to attend to the disposing of the remaining lots. and the business transactions which have rested upon him [Joseph Smith]. Alanson Ripley was appointed steward to see that all the necessary wants of the First Presidency be supplied, as well as to provide sufficient means or appropriations for a clerk or clerks to aid President Joseph Smith, Jun., in his important work.

Hosea Stout, Clerk.

Minutes of the Conference held at Stanley Hill, Castle Froome, Herefordshire, England, June 21st, 1840.

The preachers and members of the Froome's Hill Circuit of the United Brethren met at the house of Elder John Cheese, on Stanley Hill, Herefordshire, England, June 21, A. D. 1840, at ten a.m., according to previous notice; the meeting was called to order by Elder Thomas Kington; Elder Wilford Woodruff was chosen president, and Elder John Benbow, clerk of the meeting.

After prayer by Elder Richards, and remarks by the president concerning the business of the day, it was moved by Elder Thomas Kington, and seconded by Elder John Benbow, that [the several districts represented at] this meeting be hereafter known by the name of the "Froome's Hill Conference of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints," organized and established by the will and commandment of God, in the United States of America, on the 6th day of April, 1830, this being the 15th day of the third month of the eleventh year of the rise of the Church. Carried unanimously.

Moved by Elder Richards, seconded by Elder Kington, that Thomas Clark, Charles Price, James Hill, and Samuel Jones be ordained Elders; also that John James, Joseph Skinn, Henry Jones, James Baldwin, John Morgan, Samuel Badham, and John Dyer, be ordained Priests; also that Robert Hill, George Brooks, James Skinn, and James Watkins be ordained Teachers; carried unanimously; and they were ordained under the hands of Elders Woodruff and Richards.

Moved by Elder Kington, and seconded by Elders Woodruff and Richards, that John James, Priest, have the care of the church at Froome's Hill; John Parry, Priest, have the care of the church at Stanley Hill; James Burns, Priest, have the care of the church at Ridgway Cross; William Possons, Priest, have the care of the church at Moor-end Cross; Jonathan Lucy, Priest, have the care of the church at Caldwell; Thomas Jones, Priest, have the care of the church at Pale House; John Preece, Priest, have the care of the church at Ledbury; Samuel Warren, Priest, have the care of the church at Keysend Street; James Baldwin, Priest, have the care of the church at Wind Point; George Allen, Priest, have the care of the church at Woferwood Common.

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Rough Leasow, Birchwood, Tunbridge, and Dunsclose will all be united in one branch, called Dunsclose.

Samuel Badham, Priest, to have the care of the church at Dunsclose; Edward Phillips, Priest, to have care of the church at Ashfield and Crowcut; John Meeks, Priest, to have care of the church at Old Starridge; John Galley, Priest, to have care of the church at Hope Rough; Benj. Williams, Priest, to have care of the church at Shucknell Hill; John Powell, Priest, to have care of the church at Lugwardine; John Dyer, Priest, to have care of the church at Marden; William Evans, Priest, to have care of the church at Stokes Lane; John Fidoe, Priest, to have care of the church at Bishop Froome. Carried unanimously.

Moved by Elder Richards, and seconded by Elder Kington, that Elder Thomas Clark have charge of the churches at Dunsclose, Old Starridge, Ashfield, and Crowcut; that Elder Samuel Jones have charge of the churches at Keys-end Street, Wind Point, Colwell, Pale House, and Malvern Hill; that Elder Philip Green have charge of the churches at Shucknall Hill, Lugwardine, and Marden; that Elder John Cheese have charge of the churches at Stokes Lane, Woferwood Common, and Bishop Froome; that Elder Charles Price have charge of the churches at Ledbury, Moor-end Cross, and Ridgway Cross; that Elder James Hill have charge of the churches at Hope Rough and Stanley Hill; that Elder John Benbow have charge of the church at Froome's Hill. Carried unanimously.

Moved by the president, seconded by Elder Richards, that Elder Thomas Kington be the Presiding Elder over this conference.

After remarks by the president, the meeting adjourned till 2 o'clock p.m. During the recess ten persons were baptized.

Assembled at 2 o'clock according to adjournment, and administered the sacrament to several hundred Saints; after which twenty were confirmed, and twenty children blessed under the hands of Elders Woodruff and Richards, accompanied with instructions by the president, explanatory of the ordinance.

Moved by Elder Richards, seconded by the president, that Elder Thomas Kington represent this Conference to the general conference at Manchester on the 6th of July; carried. Moved and carried that the clerk of the conference present to the Presiding Elder, T. Lington, a copy of the minutes of this conference for safe keeping; also a copy to present to the general conference at Manchester. The minutes were then read and accepted. The president, followed by Elder Richards, then proceeded to give such instruction to the Saints concerning the order of the Church, and the several duties of the members, as the Spirit directed; and bore testimony to the multitude of the truth of the work; followed by Elder Kington; when it was moved by Elder Richards, seconded by the president, that this conference adjourn to the 21st September next, 10 o'clock a.m., at this place; carried.

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After prayer and singing, the assembly dispersed, the Elders and officers went into council, when it was moved by Elder Richards, and seconded by Elder Kington, that we proceed to establish and organize monthly councils of the officers of the Froome's Hill Conference, to commence on Friday, the 3rd of July next, at half-past seven o'clock p.m., in the several divisions, respectively assigned to the different Elders, viz.—

Elder Thomas Clark, president, and James Meeks, clerk, Dunsclose; Elder Charles Price, president, Thomas Jenkins, clerk, Moor-end Cross; Samuel Jones, president, William Williams, clerk, Wind Point; James Hill, president, Joseph Pullen, clerk, Stanley Hill; Philip Green, president, Francis Burnett, clerk, Lugwardine; John Benbow, president, John Morgan, clerk, Froome's Hill; John Cheese, president, George Allen, clerk, Stoke's Lane. Carried.

Moved by Elder Richards, and seconded by Elder Kington, that a monthly general council of the officers of this conference be held at Stanley Hill, to commence on Friday, the 17th of July next, at half-past seven o'clock, p.m. Elder Thomas Kington, president, and Elder John Benbow, clerk. Carried unanimously.

The president then proceeded to explain the nature of the Priesthood, and the duties and privileges of the several officers, and gave such instruction as their situation required, followed by Elder Richards, who explained many important principles connected with the building up of the Kingdom.

The minutes of the council were then read and accepted when the council adjourned; and after singing "The Spirit of God," &c., the brethren separated, with feelings of gratitude and thanksgiving, that God had been with His people, and that the spirit of union and love had prevailed in all the deliberations of the day.

Wilford Woodruff, President.

John Benbow, Clerk.

Remarks—The different branches in this region are so scattered, that it has not been possible to ascertain the number of members connected with each individual church; but connected with the Bran Green and Gadfield Elm, and the Froome's Hill conferences, together with a small branch of Little Garway of twelve members, one Priest, and one Teacher, are thirty-three churches, five hundred and thirty-four members, seventy-five officers, viz., ten Elders, fifty-two priests, and thirteen teachers. And for the comforting of the Saints, and with heart-felt gratitude to our heavenly Father, we would say that it is less than four months since the fulness of the Gospel was first preached in this region; which is a proof that God is beginning to make a short work in these last days.

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Wilford Woodruff.

Carpenter's Hall.

June 21.—The Saints hired the Carpenters' Hall in Manchester, which is large enough to accommodate ten or fifteen hundred hearers, for five hundred dollars a year, payable by contribution, and Elders Young and Pratt preached therein this day for the first time.

Monday, 22.—Elder Young went to Liverpool to see about printing the Book of Mormon, and returned to Manchester on the 26th; and on Sunday, 28th, preached in Carpenters' Hall.

June 27.—High Council met at my office.

Minutes of the High Council.

Alanson Ripley states to the council that he was authorized to inform them that President Joseph Smith, Jun., had vetoed 5 the proceedings of the Council of the 20th June, in relation to his Memorial. Laid over for hearing until Friday next.

Hosea Stout, Clerk.

Letter of William W. Phelps—Confessing Errors committed in Missouri.

Dayton, Ohio, June 29, 1840.

Brother Joseph—I am alive, and with the help of God I mean to live still. I am as the prodigal son, though I never doubt or disbelieve the fulness of the Gospel. I have been greatly abused and humbled, and I blessed the God of Israel when I lately read your prophetic blessing on my head, as follows:

"The Lord will chasten him because he taketh honor to himself, and when his soul is greatly humbled he will forsake the evil. Then shall the light of the Lord break upon him as at noonday and in him shall be no darkness," &c.

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I have seen the folly of my way, and I tremble at the gulf I have passed. So it is, and why I know not. I prayed and God answered, but what could I do? Says I, "I will repent and live, and ask my old brethren to forgive me, and though they chasten me to death, yet I will die with them, for their God is my God. The least place with them is enough for me, yea, it is bigger and better than all Babylon." Then I dreamed that I was in a large house with many mansions, with you and Hyrum and Sidney, and when it was said, "Supper must be made ready," by one of the cooks, I saw no meat, but you said there was pleanty, and you showed me much, and as good as I ever saw; and while cutting to cook, your heart and mine beat within us, and we took each other's hand and cried for joy, and I awoke and took courage.

I know my situation, you know it, and God knows it, and I want to be saved if my friends will help me. Like the captain that was cast away on a desert island; when he got off he went to sea again, and made his fortune the next time, so let my lot be. I have done wrong and I am sorry. The beam is in my own eye. I have not walked along with my friends according to my holy anointing. I ask forgiveness in the name of Jesus Christ of all the Saints, for I will do right, God helping me. I want your fellowship; if you cannot grant that, grant me your peace and friendship, for we are brethren, and our communion used to be sweet, and whenever the Lord brings us together again, I will make ail the satisfaction on every point that Saints or God can require. Amen. 6

W. W. Phelps.

Letter of Elders Orson Hyde and John E. Page to Presidents Joseph Smith, Hyrum Smith, Sidney Rigdon, Pleading for William W. Phelps.

Dear Brother:—We have been in this place a few days, and have preached faithfully, a very great prospect of some able and influential men embracing the faith in this place. We have moved along slowly, but have left a sealing testimony. Baptized a considerable number. We shall write again more particularly as soon as we learn the result of our labors here. We are well and in good spirits through the favor of the Lord.

Brother Phelps requests us to write a few lines in his letter, and we cheerfully embrace the opportunity. Brother Phelps says he wants to live, but we do not feel ourselves authorized to act upon his case, but have recommended him to you; but he says his poverty will not allow him to visit you in person, at this time, and we think he tells the truth. We therefore advise him to write, which he has done.

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He tells us verbally that he is willing to make any sacrifice to procure your fellowship, life not excepted, yet reposing that confidence in your magnanimity that you will take no advantage of this open and frank confession. If he can obtain your fellowship he wants to come to Commerce as soon as he can. But if he cannot be received into the fellowship of the Church, he must do the best he can in banishment and exile.

Brethren, with you are the keys of the Kingdom; to you is power given to "exert your clemency, or display your vengeance." By the former you will save a soul from death, and hide a multitude of sins; by the latter, you will forever discourage a returning prodigal cause sorrow without benefit, pain without pleasure, [and the] ending [of Brother Phelps] in wretchedness and despair. But former experience teaches [us] that you are workmen in the art of saving souls; therefore with greater confidence do we recommend to your clemency and favorable consideration, the author [of the foregoing] and subject of this communication. "Whosoever will, let him take of the waters of life freely." Brother Phelps says he will, and so far as we are concerned we say he may.

In the bonds of the covenant,

Orson Hyde,

John E. Page.

The Committee of the Twelve in England finished the collection of hymns and prepared the index for the press; and on the 30th Elders Kimball and Richards arrived at Manchester.

Wednesday, July 1, 1840.—Elders Wilford Woodruff and George A. Smith arrived at Manchester from the Potteries.

July 2.

Minutes of a meeting of the Crooked Creek Branch of the Church.

At a meeting of the Saints of Crooked Creek Branch, on the 2nd of July, 1840, to take into consideration the propriety of having a Stake of Zion appointed or located somewhere in the bounds of this branch, Brother John Hicks was called to the chair. Meeting was opened by prayer, after which several remarks were made, and the following resolutions were passed:

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Resolved: That it be our wishes that a Stake of Zion be appointed or located within the bounds of this Branch, provided it should meet the minds of the First Presidency of this Church.

Resolved: That a committee of three be appointed to ascertain the mind of the First Presidency and report to the Branch.

Resolved: That Joseph Holebrook, Nathaniel Frampton, and John Hicks compose said committee.

It was ascertained that there were about 2,525 acres of land owned by the brethren, and wherever the Stake should be appointed the lands should be donated or purchased for a very small compensation, and that there are one hundred and twelve members belonging to this Branch.

Resolved: That we meet on Thursday next, at one o'clock, p.m., to receive the report of the committee,

Resolved: That the proceedings of this meeting be signed by the president and clerk.

John A. Hicks, President.

William Whiteman, Clerk.

Friday, 3.—High Council met at my office.

Minutes of High Council at Nauvoo.

The subject of the Memorial of President Joseph Smith, Jun., was brought up for a rehearing, according to the decision of the last Council (June 27) when the following resolutions were entered into:

1st. Resolved: That we feel perfectly satisfied with the course taken by Joseph Smith, Jun., and feel a disposition, as far as it is in our power, to assist him, so as to relieve him from the temporalities of the Church, in order that he may devote his time more particularly to the spiritualities of the same, believing by so doing we shall promote the good of the whole Church. But as he (Joseph Smith, Jun.) is held responsible for the payment of the city plot, and knowing no way to relieve him from the responsibility at present, we would request of him to act as treasurer for the city plot and to whom [i.e., President Smith] those persons whom we may appoint to make sales of lots and attend to the business affairs of the Church may at all times be responsible, and make true and correct returns of all their proceedings, as well as to account for all monies, properties, etc., which may come into their hands. Therefore

Resolved: That Elder Henry G. Sherwood act as Clerk for the same. That Bishop Alanson Ripley be appointed to provide for the wants of the Presidency, and make such appropriations to them, and to their clerk or clerks, which they may require.

Resolved: That the funds of the city plot shall not be taken to provide for the Presidency or clerks, but that the Bishops be instructed to raise funds from other sources to meet calls made on them; and monies received for lots shall be deposited in the hands of the Treasurer to liquidate the debts of the city plot.

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The resolutions of the Crooked Creek Branch of the 2nd inst., were taken into consideration by President Joseph Smith, Jun., and it was thought proper to establish a Stake on Crooked Creek, agreeably to the request of said Branch, and a letter was written to the brethren to that effect.

Robert B. Thompson, Scribe.

Reflections of the Prophet on the Action of Congress.

Since Congress has decided against us, the Lord has begun to vex this nation, and He will continue to do so except they repent; for they now stand guilty of murder, robbery and plunder, as a nation, because they have refused to protect their citizens, and to execute justice according to their own Constitution. A hailstorm has visited South Carolina; some of the stones are said to have measured nine inches in circumference, which swept the crops, killing some cattle. Insects are devouring crops on the high lands, where the floods of the country have not reached, and great commercial distress prevails everywhere.

Chapter 7.

1. One of the noted heights of the Black Mountains, running through the west part of Herefordshire.

2. See Biographical Note, Vol. I, pp. 128-9.

3. The Millennial Star was the first foreign publication of the Church. It was issued as a monthly, but afterwards more frequently, semi-monthly, and finally, and now for many years, a weekly. Its publication has been continuous from the time it was started until the present—1907. Also the Star has retained the general character imparted to it by its first publishers. "The Millennial Star," said its Prospectus, "will stand aloof from the common political and commercial news of the day. Its columns will be devoted to the spread of the fulness of the Gospel—the restoration of the ancient principles of Christianity—the gathering of Israel—the rolling forth of the kingdom of God among the nations—the signs of the times—the fulfillment of prophecy—recording the judgments of God as they befall the nations whether signs in the heavens or in the earth, blood fire or vapor of smoke—in short, whatever is shown forth indicative of the coming of the 'Son of Man' and ushering in of his universal reign upon the earth. It will also contain letters from our numerous Elders who are abroad, preaching the word both in America and Europe containing news of their success in ministering the blessings of the glorious Gospel."

As an explanation of its title and mission, the editor in its first number also said:

"The word Millennium signifies a thousand years, and in this sense of the word, may be applied to any [period of a] thousand years, whether under the reign of wickedness or righteousness. But the term the Millennium, is generally understood to apply to the particular thousand years which is mentioned in the Scriptures as the reign of peace—the great sabbath of creation, of which all the other sabbaths or jubilees seem to be but types. It is written that a 'thousand years is as one day, and one day as a thousand years with the Lord.' This being the case, then seven thousand years are seven days with the Lord, and the seventh, or last thousand years would, of course, be a sabbath or jubilee; a rest, a grand release from servitude and woe. * * * The curse will be taken from off the earth, and it will cease to bring forth thorns and thistles, and become fertile as it were a paradise, while sickness, premature death, and all their attendant train of pains and sorrows will scarce be known upon its face; thus peace, and joy, and truth, and love, and knowledge, and plenty, and glory, will cover the face of the earth as the waters do the sea. The tabernacle of God and his sanctuary will be with man, in the midst of the holy cities; and joy and gladness will all the measure of their cup. Such then, is the Great Millennium of which our little 'Star' would fain announce the dawn."

4. The matter in brackets occurs in the Ms. History as also in the History as published in the Millennial Star, but it is evidently the comment of the Church Historians.

5. By reference to the minutes of the High Council which took into consideration the Prophet's "Memorial" it is evident that they failed to grasp the importance of the subjects presented to them, and made such disposition of them as was neither in keeping with the dignity of the Prophet or the weight of the matters on which they acted—hence the "veto," or dissatisfaction with the council's action—See p. 144 for the conclusion of the matter.

6. For William W. Phelps' troubles in the church, which brought him to this great sorrow and repentance, see vol. 3, pp. 3, 7, 56, 358, 359, 360 and notes.