Moroni 7 to 9 – “May Christ Lift Thee Up”

These chapters include messages from Mormon to his son and to all readers. Mormon encourages us to let the atonement of Christ rest in our minds and find hope and peace.  

“‘The Pure Love of Christ’: The Divine Precept of Charity in Moroni 7,” Matthew O. Richardson, Living the Book of Mormon: Abiding by Its Precepts
Mormon did not define charity simply as the “love of Christ” but as the “pure love of Christ.” Love and Christ are inseparable. In other words, charity is the pure “love of Christ,” the genuine form of His love.

Lesson 48: Moroni 7-8, 10, James Faulconer, Times and Seasons
Here are questions that lead to thoughtful study. What do covenants have to do with Mormon’s sermon (Moroni 7:31)? Why are the references to covenants in the middle of a discussion of our ministry, itself in the middle of an argument that miracles still occur?

“‘All Are Alike unto God’: Equality and Charity in the Book of Mormon,” Lloyd D. Newell, Living the Book of Mormon: Abiding by Its Precepts
Moroni 7 and 8, Mormon’s teachings, stress that charity and equality are two expressions of the same principle.

Why Did Moroni Write So Many Farewells? (Mormon 8:1), Book of Mormon Central staff
Moroni’s three separate farewells provide readers with three different opportunities to understand the purposes of the Book of Mormon through the eyes of Moroni, its last author and record keeper.

On the Dating of Moroni 8-9, Joseph M. Spencer, Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship
Textual evidence suggests that Moroni 8 was written in the years 345–50, and Moroni 9 in the years 375–80. This dating allows interpretive and theological conclusions, principally that Moroni’s inclusion of the letters forces readers to recognize that Mormon’s history is theologically motivated.

“Alive in Christ: the Salvation of Little Children,” Robert L. Millet, Fourth Nephi, From Zion to Destruction
The false doctrine of original sin is based upon the notion that Adam and Eve’s disobedience was an act of overt rebellion against the Almighty, an attempt to usurp the knowledge available only to the gods. Moroni 8 teaches that little children are whole, and their actions are covered by God’s mercy.