Journal 53:3 | BYU Studies

Journal 53:3

David Hale's Store Ledger: New Details about Joseph and Emma Smith, the Hale Family, and the Book of Mormon [Long Version]

In December 1827, Joseph and Emma Smith arrived in Harmony, Pennsylvania, to live while Joseph translated the gold plates. Harmony was the home of Emma's family, and Emma's brother David Hale had a small store that was used for trading goods and work among the neighbors. David kept a ledger that records Joseph's purchases of leatherwork, a shovel, a pocketbook, a pocketknife, and a comb. Joseph... Read more
55:3 Cover
BYU Studies Quarterly 53.3 presents articles that will appeal to a wide audience. Jack Harrell, an author of short stories and other fiction, describes his search for a Mormon literary theory, finding in Mormon literature a foundation of meaning and ethics that may belong in the post-postmodern movement. Cheryl Preston writes that Church structure is, in many ways, less hierarchical than might be...Read more

From the Editor

At the beginning of this new academic year, which also comes with the inauguration of Kevin J. Worthen as president of Brigham Young University, all of us at BYU Studies are pleased to release this latest issue of the BYU Studies Quarterly. In his first five months in office, President Worthen has already emphasized the mission and destiny of BYU, and as I glance over the table of contents of... Read more

Toward a Mormon Literary Theory

Is there a Mormon literary theory? Jack Harrell, a professor at BYU–Idaho and writer of fiction, suggests that perhaps such a theory does exist, at least implicitly—a de facto Mormon literary theory that is yet to be delineated. This article is an attempt to begin that delineation. Harrell first gives a brief overview of LDS literary criticism, using Eugene England's four periods of Mormon... Read more

Eared grebes

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"The Spiritual Concept of Form and Function as One": Structure, Doctrine, and The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints

Cheryl B. Preston describes how the structure of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints interacts with its theological substance. Likening Church substance and structure to the design theories of architect Frank Lloyd Wright, Preston observes that unity is realized when form and function work in harmony. Form does not follow function, but goes hand in hand; thriving in a faith community... Read more

David Hale's Store Ledger: New Details about Joseph and Emma Smith, the Hale Family, and the Book of Mormon

In December 1827, Joseph and Emma Smith arrived in Harmony, Pennsylvania, to live while Joseph translated the gold plates. Harmony was the home of Emma's family, and Emma's brother David Hale had a small store that was used for trading goods and work among the neighbors. David kept a ledger that records Joseph's purchases of leatherwork, a shovel, a pocketbook, a pocketknife, and a comb. Joseph... Read more

Hunting

"I married a hunter" are the opening words of this personal essay about the author's relationship with her husband and his relationship with nature. He is a wildlife biologist who also hunts. But "Lad is a hunter, not a killer, a distinction important to him in the face of the gun-crazed, shoot-anything, 'D'ja gitcha a buck?' culture that surrounds the sport." Woven skillfully into accounts of... Read more

"If there be faults": Reviewing Earl Wunderli's An Imperfect Book

Earl M. Wunderli rejects the Book of Mormon as a literal history of ancient America. He points to what he thinks are mistakes in the text, pointing to so-called anachronistic words such as steel and silk . Matthew Roper and his colleagues convincingly overturn Wunderli's assertions. The description of Laban's sword of "most precious steel" is now considered accurate since the discovery of a meter... Read more

All Ye Need to Know

Chemistry and biochemistry professor John D. Lamb, recipient of the 2013 Karl G. Maeser Distinguished Faculty Lecturer Award, delivered this forum address on May 20, 2014 at Brigham Young University. Taking his theme from Keats's "Ode on a Grecian Urn," Lamb discusses the value of learning and different ways of gaining knowledge. He contrasts opportunities for light and learning with forces that... Read more

The Book of Jonah: Foreshadowings of Jesus as the Christ

The book of Jonah is a remarkable story perhaps best known for the stubbornness of a prophet, the great fish that swallows and then regurgitates Jonah, the conversion of the whole city of Nineveh, and the rapid growth and death of a gourd. But this small book has a much deeper, more powerful message that has been obscured through the ages: that the Messiah would live and die to make salvation... Read more

Emma Lou Thayne and the Art of Peace

BYU Studies poetry editor Casualene Meyer interviews well-known LDS poet Emma Lou Thayne. In addition to writing poetry, Thayne has been a devoted wife, mother, and grandmother; engaged in antinuclear activism; taught English at the University of Utah; and served on the Young Women's General Board and the Deseret News editorial board. Meyer's interview unfolds the story behind the lyrics for the... Read more

One Will Be Gone: Making the Bed with My Husband, Both 88

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Let Me Be Sad

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Mormon Christianity: What Other Christians Can Learn from the Latter-day Saints

Debates on Mormonism's status as a Christian religion generally revolve around dogmatic issues—what is, or what should be, Christianity's minimum theological denominator, and does LDS doctrine fit within this particular requirement in order to be classified as Christian? For Stephen Webb, the author of Mormon Christianity and a former professor of philosophy and religion at Wabash College, that... Read more

A Frontier Life: Jacob Hamblin, Explorer and Indian Missionary

Jacob Hamblin embodies one of the more colorful and interesting Mormon pioneers in Utah Territory during the second half of the nineteenth century. During his long and eventful life, he wore many hats—explorer, frontiersman, Indian agent, missionary, colonizer, community leader— and wore them well. Born on April 6, 1819, on the Ohio frontier, Hamblin left the family farm at age nineteen to strike... Read more

Habeas Corpus and the Courts: Individual Liberties from Joseph Smith to Abraham Lincoln to Guantanamo

This production was created as one of a series of annual theatrical events presented by the Illinois Supreme Court Historic Preservation Commission (ISCHPC) and the Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library and Museum (ALPLM). Previous events dramatized a retrial of Mary Surratt for her role in the assassination of Abraham Lincoln and a retrial of Mary Todd Lincoln, who was tried for charges of... Read more