41. "He Did Expound All Things unto Them" | BYU Studies

41. "He Did Expound All Things unto Them"

“Turning the Hearts of the Fathers to the Children: Nurturing the Next Generation,” by Alan J. Hawkins, Clifford J. Rhoades, and David C. Dollahite, in BYU Studies 33, no. 2

The Old Testament opens with an account of God creating order from chaos to provide an earth on which his children could dwell. Through disobedience, however, the children of Adam and Eve turned their hearts away from their Father; consequently, they separated themselves from God, and the ground has been periodically cursed. Interestingly, the Old Testament concludes with the Lord telling the world through Malachi that if there is not a returning of children's hearts to the fathers and of fathers' hearts to the children the earth will again be cursed or destroyed.

Chart 96: "Isaiah Passages Listed by Book of Mormon Reference," in Charting the Book of Mormon

Prophets in the Book of Mormon, including the Lord himself, repeatedly declared the importance of reading Isaiah's prophecies. They emphasized this point by quoting extensively from Isaiah in their own sermons and writings. This chart lists Book of Mormon passages that quote or paraphrase the words of Isaiah, which held great meaning for the Nephites and also apply to us today. The main Nephite prophets who quoted Isaiah were Nephi, Jacob, and Abinadi. Next to the Book of Mormon references in this chart are corresponding references in the book of Isaiah.

"Elijah's Mission: His Keys, Powers, and Blessings from the Old Testament to the Latter Days," by E. Dale LeBaron," in Sperry Symposium Classics: The Old Testament

The Book of Mormon records that the Savior quoted Malachi's prophecy of Elijah. He told the Nephites, "These scriptures, which ye had not with you, the Father commanded that I should give unto you" (3 Nephi 26:2).

"Seeing Third Nephi as the Holy of Holies of the Book of Mormon," by John W. Welch, in Journal of the Book of Mormon and Restoration Scripture 19, no. 1

Third Nephi and its account of the ministry of the resurrected Jesus to the Nephites has long been seen as the pinnacle of the Book of Mormon. This text can also be viewed as the Holy of Holies of the Book of Mormon. Everything in 3 Nephi, especially the ministry of the Savior, echoes themes related to the temple and the presence of the Lord in the Holy of Holies. Themes such as silence, timelessness, unity, awe, and consecration confirm this interpretation.

A Comprehensive Commentary of the Book of 3 Nephi, by Paul Nolan Hyde

3 Nephi 22

"Redeeming the Desolate Woman: The Message of Isaiah 54 and 3 Nephi 22," by Cynthia L. Hallen, in Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 7, no. 1

Third Nephi 22 (quoting Isaiah 54) addresses a desolate woman who will be redeemed in the latter days. The desolate woman represents Zion, and the Lord promises to relieve the desolation of Zion felt through barrenness, lack of a permanent home, and being forsaken and persecuted. The destiny of Zion parallels the pattern of Noah—both remain faithful to their covenants and witness a cleansing of the earth. The Savior serves as Zion’s husband. The servants of the Lord are equated with Zion—the Lord will not allow oppressors to be successful against Zion. The Lord promises to redeem Zion as he sings a song of redeeming love.

"The Lord's Covenant of Kindness: Isaiah 54 and 3 Nephi 22," by Cynthia L. Hallen, in Isaiah and the Book of Mormon

Cynthia Hallen discusses Isaiah 54 and its use in 3 Nephi. As remnants of the House of Israel, the Nephites are recipients of the blessings of that covenant as they are true and faithful to it.

"Jesus' Covenant Teachings in Third Nephi," by Victor L. Ludlow, in Rediscovering the Book of Mormon: Insights that You May Have Missed Before

In 3 Nephi 20, Jesus begins a discourse that extends through 2 Nephi 23 on what it means to be a covenant people. This article explains the doctrines and teachings found therein that are unique to the Book of Mormon. These teachings help Latter-day Saints fulfill their covenants and await the promised blessings of the Lord.

"The Father's Covenant People Sermon: 3 Nephi 20:10 - 23:5," by Victor L. Ludlow, in Third Nephi: An Incomparable Scripture

In 3 Nephi 20-23, Jesus tells the people at Bountiful and future readers about events that will fulfill the Father’s ancient covenant promises made with Abraham and the house of Israel. Combined with other Book of Mormon teachings, the Father’s Covenant People Sermon provides significant insights into the Father’s covenant promises and the key roles of the Gentiles, Isaiah’s writings, and the Book of Mormon in connection with the gathering of Israel in the last days. 

"The Doctrine of a Covenant People," by Joseph Fielding McConkie, in A Book of Mormon Treasury: Gospel Insights from General Authorities and Religious Educators

This article explains the nature of covenants in the gospel and how they have been used throughout history in the Old and New Testaments. This article focuses on Christ's ministry in 3 Nephi and how Christ made the Nephites a covenant people at Bountiful. This process included the calling of the twelve, Christ's sermon on covenants, the administration of the sacrament, and the preaching of the gospel.

"Christ's Interpretation of Isaiah 52's "My Servant" in 3 Nephi," by Gaye Strathearn, in Journal of the Book of Mormon and Other Restoration Scripture 18, no. 1

3 Nephi 20-23 quotes Isaiah and refers to a "servant" of the Lord. Interpretations for this figure include Isaiah himself, the people of Israel, Joseph Smith, and Jesus Christ. This paper claims that the Book of Mormon itself may be the servant referenced in 3 Nephi 20–23. Both the servant and the Book of Mormon are portrayed as filling the same “great and marvelous” works in the gathering of Israel, reminding the Jews of their covenants with God, and bringing the Gentiles to Christ.

3 Nephi 23

"Pattern and Purpose of the Isaiah Commentaries in the Book of Mormon," by Garold N. Davis, in Mormons, Scripture, and the Ancient World: Studies in Honor of John L. Sorenson

Jesus quotes Isaiah 52 in 3 Nephi 20 and teaches on the gathering of Israel. This article shows the changes Jesus makes to the Isaiah text and how this shows the Isaiah quotations as meaningful, and not repetitive.

"The Missing Scripture," by D. Lynn Johnson, in Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 3, no. 2

During his visit to the Nephites, the Savior instructed Nephi to add to their records a missing scripture concerning the resurrection of many of the dead immediately following his own resurrection, and their appearance to many people. There is good evidence that it was Samuel the Lamanite’s prophecy of this resurrection that was missing. Aspects of the manner of recording, abridgment, and translation of the text of the Book of Mormon are elucidated through this missing scripture as it appears in the English text.

"Christ's Interpretation of Isaiah 52's "My Servant" in 3 Nephi," by Gaye Strathearn, in Journal of the Book of Mormon and Other Restoration Scripture 18, no. 1

3 Nephi 20-23 quotes Isaiah and refers to a "servant" of the Lord. Interpretations for this figure include Isaiah himself, the people of Israel, Joseph Smith, and Jesus Christ. This paper claims that the Book of Mormon itself may be the servant referenced in 3 Nephi 20–23. Both the servant and the Book of Mormon are portrayed as filling the same “great and marvelous” works in the gathering of Israel, reminding the Jews of their covenants with God, and bringing the Gentiles to Christ.

3 Nephi 24

"The Writings of Malachi in 3 Nephi: A Foundation for Zion in the Past and Present," by Aaron P. Schade and David Rolph Seely, in Third Nephi: An Incomparable Scripture

In 3 Nephi, Jesus quotes extensively from the Old Testament prophet Malachi, whose prophecies the Nephites did not have in their scriptures. This article provides commentary on Jesus's use of Malachi and applies it to prophecies about Christ and the Restoration.

"Moroni Expounds Old Testament Scriptures," by Sydney B. Sperry, in Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 4, no. 1

The prophecies given by Moroni to Joseph Smith come from Malachi, Isaiah, and Joel. The Malachi prophecies deal with the rise and restoration of the Church, the preparation for the Millennium, and the significance of the sons of Levi. The Isaiah prophecies, explained in the Doctrine and Covenants, give a direct explanation of the Millennium and Joseph’s own role in the preparation for it. The Joel prophecies have to do with the events just prior to the “great and terrible day of the Lord.”