42. "This Is My Gospel" | BYU Studies

42. "This Is My Gospel"

Chart 174: "Christ's Invitation," from Charting the Book of Mormon

Christ's invitations appear frequently: to come unto Christ (see 2 Nephi 26:33), to believe in him and his words (see 2 Nephi 33:10), to forsake sin and be forgiven by the Lord Omnipotent (see Mosiah 4:10), to become sanctified and spotless before God (see 3 Nephi 27:20), to do good and to love God and serve him (see Moroni 7:13), to ask God for a witness of the truthfulness of the Book of Mormon (see Moroni 10:4), and to become perfected in him (see Moroni 10:32).

"The Gospel of Jesus Christ as Taught by the Nephite ​Prophets," by Noel B. Reynolds, in BYU Studies Quarterly 31, no. 3

Third Nephi presents the doctrine of the gospel in six steps (repentance, baptism, Holy Ghost, faith, endurance, eternal life) that are also taught elsewhere in the Book of Mormon and New Testament.

"'This Is My Gospel': Jesus' Discourse in 3 Nephi," by Andrew C. Skinner, in Religious Educator 11, no. 3

The statements of Jesus Christ in 3 Nephi 27:13-21 regarding "the gospel" are unique in scripture. Nowhere else in sacred writ does Jesus personally define the term with such power, clarity, and simplicity. Nowhere else does he declare personal ownership or authorship of the gospel he preached and explain it as the carrying out of his Father's will. And nowhere else in scripture does he connect so directly and succinctly his Father's will with the Crucifixion, Resurrection, and Final Judgment, and link them to the universal salvation offered to humankind.

"John the Beloved in Latter-day Scripture," by Frank F. Judd Jr. and Terry L. Szink, in The Doctrine and Covenants, Revelations in Context: The 37th Annual Brigham Young University Sidney B. Sperry

What is the significance of the parallels between 3 Nephi 28 and section 7? It is likely that the Savior simply used the same phraseology when speaking to the Nephite disciples and also the Apostles Peter and John. But it is also possible that these similarities may suggest more.

"Zion Gained and Lost: Fourth Nephi and the Quintessential Model," by Andrew C. Skinner, in Fourth Nephi, From Zion to Destruction

Of all the descriptions of Zion found in holy writ, none is as singularly instructive as the one presented in 4 Nephi. It not only teaches us about the social and religious characteristics of Zion in a more detailed way than other descriptions, but also illuminates in unmistakable terms the root causes of the demise of a Zion society.

"The Savior's Visit to America," by Ezra Taft Benson, General Conference Address, April 1987

The record of the Nephite history just prior to the Savior’s visit reveals many parallels to our own day as we anticipate the Savior’s second coming. The people were prosperous but had rejected God.

"Christ in the Old Testament and the Book of Mormon," by David E. Bokovoy and John A. Tvedtnes, in Testaments: Links between the Book of Mormon and the Hebrew Bible

The Book of Mormon clarifies that Jesus is the Messiah of the Old Testament: he is the fulfillment of the high priest; numerous people and events of the Old Testament are symbols of Christ. This is the inspired message proclaimed so passionately by the ancient authors of the Book of Mormon: Jesus is the link between the Book of Mormon and the Hebrew Bible.

"Covenant Teachings in the Book of Mormon," by Victor L. Ludlow, in The Fulness of the Gospel: Foundational Teachings from the Book of Mormon

This article discusses all the cases where Christ made covenants with his people in the Book of Mormon. Of note is the instance in 3 Nephi, when Christ visits the Nephites in the Americas and puts away the Law of Moses for a new covenant.

"Jesus the Savior in 3 Nephi," by Robert J. Matthews, in The Book of Mormon: 3 Nephi 9-30, This is My Gospel, edited by Monte S. Nyman and Charles D. Tate, Jr.

This article discusses Jesus Christ's role in 3 Nephi. Third Nephi offers greater insight into the activity and scope of Jesus' work than that found in the New Testament alone. Matthew discusses the anticipation of Christ's coming, his miraculous appearance in the Americas, the doctrines he taught, and how Jesus Christ's coming is significant for the message of the Book of Mormon and the Gospel of Jesus Christ.

"Jesus the Christ - Our Master and More," by Russell M. Nelson, in A Book of Mormon Treasury: Gospel Insights from General Authorities and Religious Educators

In a thoughtful overview, Elder Russell M. Nelson discusses how Jesus Christ fulfills each of Biblical and Book of Mormon titles attributed to him.

A Comprehensive Commentary of the Book of 3 Nephi by Paul Nolan Hyde

An in-depth commentary on every verse with historical notes and cross references.   

"The Coming of Christ," by Linda Hoffman Kimball, in The Reader's Book of Mormon: The Coming of Christ: Helaman 5 – 3 Nephi

Personal musings about Samuel the Lamanite, concluding: “I  am  overwhelmed  by  the  range  of voices, images, conflicts, messages, warnings, blessings, and miracles of these pages. I want to become very still and quiet, to take shelter under those divine wings, to open my ears to hear the central gospel message ... and I want to take note.”

3 Nephi 27

"'This Is My Gospel': Jesus' Discourse in 3 Nephi," by Andrew C. Skinner, in Religious Educator 11, no. 3

The statements of Jesus Christ in 3 Nephi 27:13-21 regarding "the gospel" are unique in scripture. Nowhere else in sacred writ does Jesus personally define the term with such power, clarity, and simplicity. Nowhere else does he declare personal ownership or authorship of the gospel he preached and explain it as the carrying out o his Father's will. And nowhere else in scripture does he connect so directly and succinctly his Father's will with the Crucifixion, Resurrection, and Final Judgment, and link them to the universal salvation offered to humankind.

“Echoes from the Sermon on the Mount,” by John W. Welch, in The Sermon on the Mount in Latter-day Scripture

Jesus quoted key phrases, often in inverted order, from the Sermon on the Mount (3 Nephi 12–14) in subsequent Book of Mormon chapters (3 Nephi 15–28), thus demonstrating that the sermon was accepted as an authoritative text establishing and defining Jesus’s kingdom on earth. Although rarely considered in this light, Peter, James, Paul, and the Gospel writers quoted from all parts of the Sermon on the Mount, similarly substantiating the authoritative functions of the sermon as a foundational text in early Christianity. Literary analysis supports the ideas that these quotations were intentional, that an awareness of the sermon was widespread in the earliest decades of Christianity, and that audiences to which Jesus and his apostles spoke were familiar with the teachings and commandments found in the Sermon on the Mount.

3 Nephi 28

"The Three Nephites and the Doctrine of Translation," by Clyde J. Williams, in The Book of Mormon: 3 Nephi 9-30, This is My Gospel

While translation is ambiguously referred to in the stories of Elijah and John the Beloved, the Latter-day Saint is unique in its development of the doctrine of translation. This article walks through the history of translation in Church History, and how the story of the Three Nephites is integral to our understanding of translated beings.

"Out of the Dust: Names of the Three Nephites?" in Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 9, no. 1

Oliver Huntington was an early LDS pioneer who wrote or dictated numerous reminiscences, including on his association with Joseph Smith. On 16 February 1895, he wrote the names of the three Nephites.

"John the Beloved in Latter-day Scripture," by Frank F. Judd, Jr., and Terry L. Szink, in The Doctrine and Covenants, Revelations in Context: The 37th Annual Brigham Young University Sidney B. Sperry

Discusses the historical background of D&C 7 and proposes that Joseph Smith’s translation of 3 Nephi 28 led to questions about John the Beloved. Explains LDS doctrine on translated beings, who devote themselves to the service of the Lord.

4 Nephi 1

"Light or Dark, Freedom or Bondage: Enhancing Book of Mormon Themes through Contrasts," by Blair G. Van Dyke, in Religious Educator: Perspectives on the Restored Gospel 6, no. 3

While this article deals with strong contrasts throughout the Book of Mormon, Van Dyke highlights an example found in 4 Nephi. 4 Nephi both establishes a great era of prosperity and peace, and then very quickly dissolves into another period of war and wickedness. He discusses how this contrast can be meaningful for the everyday reader.

"Zion Gained and Lost: Fourth Nephi as the Quintessential Model," by Andrew C. Skinner, in The Book of Mormon: Fourth Nephi Through Moroni, From Zion to Destruction

Of all the descriptions of Zion found in holy writ, none is as singularly instructive as the one presented in 4 Nephi. It not only teaches us about the social and religious characteristics of Zion in a more detailed way than other descriptions, but also illuminates in unmistakable terms the root causes of the demise of a Zion society.