7. "He Took Our Infirmities, and Bare Our Sicknesses" | BYU Studies

7. "He Took Our Infirmities, and Bare Our Sicknesses"

Miracles
 
 
This entry defines a miracle as a "beneficial event brought about through divine power that mortals do not understand and of themselves cannot duplicate." It explains that miracles are beneficial for personal growth, but they usually happen after faith is established.
 
 
This chart lists forty-two of the miracles that Jesus performed, along with their scriptural references in Matthew, Mark, Luke and John. The chart shows that Jesus was a man of deeds as well as a man of words.
 
 
This article discusses the seven miracles of Jesus that are recorded in chapters 2-11 of the book of John. Author Blair Van Dyke writes, "Since John’s Gospel is generally understood to have been directed toward an audience that already believed that Jesus is the Christ, we may reasonably conclude that the purpose of these seven miracles…is to deepen faith in Christ." Through this article, readers may gain a deeper understanding of how sharply the Gospel of John is focused on Christ.
 
The Testimony of Luke, by S. Kent Brown, BYU Studies, 2014
 
It is an in-depth commentary on every verse of Luke. Kent Brown tells how Luke sees Jesus as both the Savior and as a person, giving details about his family, his humility, and other personal aspects. This ebook will assist in study of Jesus’ miracles and other topics throughout the course of New Testament study. Kent Brown is also affiliated with the BYU New Testament Commentary.
 
The Miracles of Jesus, by Eric D. Huntsman, Deseret Book, 2014
 
The miracles of Jesus are more than individual blessings; author Eric Huntsman asserts that they are also symbols of Jesus and his atonement. Using textual analysis, paintings, music, and photographs, Huntsman illuminates the deeper meaning behind the miracles and suggests personal application. Eric Huntsman is affiliated with the BYU New Testament Commentary and BYU Studies.