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Page: 1 of 1 5 records were found for 'D. Michael Quinn'
ReviewArticle
Categories: New York Period
Journal: 27:4
Description:

In the past several years there has been a noticeably growing interest in alternative explanations for Mormon origins. Perhaps this is due to a certain lingering uneasiness that the present theories of cause are inadequate to explain the magnitude of the effects. At any rate, the most recent attempt to find a more satisfying explanation for Joseph Smith and the religion he founded is D. Michael Quinn's Early...

ReviewArticle
Categories: New York Period
Journal: 27:4
Description:

Because I know the circumstances surrounding the establishment of Mormonism only in a general way, I shall leave to the professional historian the task of commenting on those circumstances as they are presented by D. Michael Quinn in Early Mormonism and the Magic World View. In what follows, I shall discuss the book from the point of view of the general reader for whom Quinn says he intended the work and from the point of view of my own discipline, folklore.

ReviewArticle
Categories: Book Reviews
Journal: 34:4
Description:

John L. Brooke, an associate professor of history at Tufts University, is, by his own description, "not a Mormon historian;" his earlier work has centered on the eighteenth- and early nineteenth-century social history of Massachusetts and New England. His new book does not claim to be "necessarily a well-rounded approach to early Mormonism" or "a balanced history," but is rather a...

Article
Journal: 20:3
Description:

In the last issue of BYU Studies, D. Michael Quinn presented for the first time a chronology of the Council of Fifty that annihilates the previously held theory that this Council was one of the most important institutions in nineteenth-century Mormon history. Formally organized by Joseph Smith on 11 March 1844, just three months before he was murdered at Carthage, Illinois, the Council of Fifty was his concrete...

Issue
Description: BYU Studies Staff remember T. Edgar Lyon in "In Memoriam: T. Edgar Lyon." Then, Leland H. Gentry addresses the question "What of the Lectures on Faith" by saying, what, when and where these series of presentations took place. Also there are two articles on prayer circles. The first one is by Hugh W. Nibley, then there is one by D. Michael Quinn.
Page: 1 of 1